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For a Woman

Directed by Diane Kurys

Inspired by her own family history, Kurys’s (Sagan, Peppermint Soda) handsome drama moves between post-World War II France and the

Friends from France

Directed by Philippe Kotlarski, Kira Saksaganskaya, Anne Weil

In 1979, a young couple, Carole and Jérôme, go behind the Iron Curtain to Odessa on a vacation to celebrate

Gate of Flesh

Directed by Seijun Suzuki

Part social realist drama, part sadomasochistic trash opera, Gate of Flesh paints a dog-eat-dog portrait of postwar Tokyo. The film

Gigi

Directed by Vincente Minnelli

Winner of nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director, this glorious depiction of Belle Époque Paris stars Leslie

Hanna’s Journey

Directed by Julia Von Heinz

Hanna’s motives for spending several months in Israel working with disabled youths and elderly Holocaust survivors aren’t exactly noble: a

Harold and Maude

Directed by Hal Ashby

A classic of the much-mythologized New American Cinema of the 1970s, Harold and Maude follows Harold (Bud Cort), a moneyed yet

Haruko’s Paranormal Laboratory

Directed by Lisa Takeba

Reminiscent of the early work of Michel Gondry but carving a path uniquely its own thanks to a decidedly rough-hewn

Hawaii

Directed by Marco Berger

VISITING ARTIST—“Following on from his acclaimed explorations of nascent male desire, PLAN B and ABSENT, Marco Berger continues to impress

Humoresque

Directed by Jean Negulesco

Featuring a soundtrack packed to the gills with famed classical compositions, Humoresque gave Joan Crawford the opportunity to ascend the

I Am Yours

Directed by Iram Haq

Mina is a young single mother living in Oslo with her six-year-old son Felix. A Norwegian-Pakistani, she has a troublesome

Ice Mother

Directed by Bohdan Sláma

Sláma’s charming, romantic drama centers on themes of familial conflict and the possibility of rebirth at any age. After her

In the Mood for Love

Directed by Wong Kar-Wai

A tiny, sparsely populated slice of early-1960s Hong Kong forms the backdrop for Wong’s hyper-stylish yet thorny dissection of the