Skip to content

The Big Sleep

Directed by Howard Hawks

One of the key noirs of the 1940s, The Big Sleep features several legends of the American page and screen—Lauren

The Lady From Shanghai

Directed by Orson Welles

Here writer/director Welles smolders alongside bombshell Rita Hayworth (Welles’ second wife) in a wildly stylish film noir that was years

The Long Goodbye

Directed by Robert Altman

As a tribute to, or perhaps in contempt of, the noir detective story, Altman subverts genre convention by re-imagining the

The Stranger

Directed by Orson Welles

Welles’ post-war thriller tackles Nazism head-on as UN War Crimes Inspector Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) searches for Welles’ fugitive Franz

The Third Man

Directed by Carol Reed

Pulp novelist Holly Martins (Joseph Cotten) travels to shadowy postwar Vienna at the invitation of an old friend, black-market opportunist

The Trial

Directed by Orson Welles

Welles translates one of Franz Kafka’s best-known literary works into a disorienting black-and-white cinematic world of crime and punishment. After

They Live by Night

Directed by Nicholas Ray

After working with Elia Kazan for many years as an assistant, Ray’s directorial debut is the first in a significant

Thieves’ Highway

Directed by Jules Dassin

WWII vet Nick Garcos (Richard Conte) returns to San Francisco, intending to go into the apple business with his father.

Touch of Evil

Directed by Orson Welles

Celebrated as one of the greatest film noirs ever made, Welles’ mid-career morality tale sees him writing, directing, and starring

White Nights

Directed by Luchino Visconti

Adapting a Dostoyevsky short story set in 19th-century St. Petersburg to 1950s Liverno, Italy, Visconti's theatrical film tale is of

Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Directed by Robert Zemeckis

A private dick (played with gruff sincerity by the late Bob Hoskins), whose life has been ruined by ’toons, is

You Make Me Feel So Young

Directed by Zach Weintraub

Weintraub’s third feature exemplifies his intimate filmmaking style, with a minimalism reminiscent of Yasujiro¯ Ozu, Claire Denis, and many other



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.