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The Untamed

Directed by Amat Escalante

A meteorite brings a strange creature with an ability to intensely satisfy sexual desire to Guanajuato, Mexico. Director Amat Escalante

The Wicker Man

Directed by Robin Hardy

Named the #4 best horror film of all time by The Guardian, Robin Hardy’s cult artifact The Wicker Man is

Theatre of Blood

Directed by Douglas Hickox

Of all the campy, deranged, and occasionally homicidal roles memorably embodied by horror film icon Vincent Price, this was reportedly

They Live

Directed by John Carpenter

John Carpenter—absolutely a master filmmaker by 1988, with such key films as Assault on Precinct 13, Escape from New York,

Trouble Every Day

Directed by Claire Denis

Sex and violence bleed together in Claire Denis' erotic horror tale of an American scientist (Vincent Gallo) on honeymoon in

Vampyr

Directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer

Shot on location and in three languages at a time when both practices were radical innovations, Dreyer’s haunting vision of

Videodrome

Directed by David Cronenberg

Cable television broadcaster Max Renn (James Woods) discovers a pirate TV station that behaves like an opiate capable of twisting

What Metal Girls Are Into

Directed by Laurel Vail

Three women attending a metal festival in the desert find something disturbing in the freezer of their isolated vacation rental.

What We Become

Directed by Bo Mikkelsen

Idyllic suburban life is shattered when news spreads of a viral infection at a neighboring rest home. Soon enough, the

White Zombie

Directed by Victor Halperin

I Walked With A Zombie, Night of the Living Dead, and countless other films trace their lineage back to White



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.