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Still from King Kong, 1933

King Kong

Directed by Ernest B. Schoedsack, Merian C. Cooper

At the time of its release, King Kong was the greatest spectacle the filmgoing public had ever seen. A classic

Kooky

Directed by Jan Svěrák

Sverak’s charming family film combines puppet animation, stop-motion, and live-action to tell the story of a young man with asthma

Labyrinth – SOLD OUT

Directed by Jim Henson

Sixteen-year-old Sarah is given thirteen hours to solve a labyrinth and rescue her baby brother Toby when her wish for

Liza the Fox-Fairy

Directed by Károly Ujj Mészáros

Liza’s a lonely nurse whose search for a companion always ends in the same way— with the death of her

Madame X: An Absolute Ruler

Directed by Ulrike Ottinger

Ulrike Ottinger’s 1978 debut follows Madame X (Tabea Blumenschein) as she heads the pirate ship Orlando with an iron fist

My Neighbor Totoro

Directed by Hayao Miyazaki

The third Studio Ghibli feature tells the story of two young sisters, Satsuki and Mei Kusakabe, who move with their

My Twentieth Century

Directed by Ildikó Enyedi

Budapest, 1880: twins Lili and Dora are born, nearly simultaneously with Thomas Edison’s invention of the light bulb—a key piece

One Hundred and One Nights

Directed by Agnès Varda

A celebration of cinema at one hundred years of age, this broad and whimsical comedy stars screen legend Michel Piccoli

Princess Mononoke

Directed by Hayao Miyazaki

A landmark of animation and a film of unsurpassed power and beauty, Miyazaki’s epic story of conflict and balance between

Russian Ark

Directed by Aleksandr Sokurov

“RUSSIAN ARK is both a dazzling technical tour-de-force and a love letter to Russian culture. Unfolding in real time in

The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T

Directed by Roy Rowland

The magnificently eccentric mind of Theodor Geisel (a.k.a. Dr. Seuss) broke its children’s literature leash to conjure up this outrageous

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad

Directed by Nathan Juran

While today’s digitally rendered animated films astound in looking virtually real, Ray Harryhausen’s timeless, hand-crafted wonderwork —his first film in



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.