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Wonderful World End

Directed by Daigo Matsui

Incorporating live video feed-style footage, text message overlays, and more than its fair share of on-screen emoji, Matsui’s film is

Working Girls

Directed by Dorothy Arzner

Dorothy Arzner was the only female—let alone out lesbian—filmmaker working at a major Hollywood studio in the 1920s and ’30s,

Wrong Move

Directed by Wim Wenders

Glückstadt in northern Germany, a palace along the Rhine, a housing project on the outskirts of Frankfurt, and finally the

Xenia

Directed by Panos H. Koutras

After the death of their Albanian mother, two brothers—the younger Dany, a flamboyantly gay teen, and the elder Ody (short

Yojimbo

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Set at the end of the Tokugawa era, YOJIMBO follows the rōnin Sanjuro (Toshirô Mifune) who, while wandering the countryside,

You and Me

Directed by Fritz Lang

Department store owner Mr. Morris (Harry Carey) runs a tight ship, but differs from his competitors in that he hires

You, the Living

Directed by Roy Andersson

You, the Living hilariously explores man’s existence, behavior, thoughts, worries, happiness, sorrow, and a profound longing for validation and love

Youth

Directed by Feng Xiaogang

Starting out in the 1970s, Feng Xiaogang’s film chronicles the joys and travails of a provincial military-arts troupe, People’s Liberation

Yumeji

Directed by Seijun Suzuki

Made ten years after its predecessor, the final film in the Taisho Trilogy spins a fantastical tale from the life

Zama

Directed by Lucrecia Martel

“Martel ventures into the realm of historical fiction and makes the genre entirely her own in this adaptation of Antonio

Zigeunerweisen

Directed by Seijun Suzuki

Named the best film of the 1980s in a poll of Japanese film critics, Zigeunerweisen takes its title from a

Zola

Directed by Janicza Bravo

"Y'all wanna hear a story about why me & this bitch here fell out? It's kind of long but full



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.