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About 111 Girls

Directed by Nahid Ghobadi, Bijan Zmanpira

A darkly comic road movie with deadly serious implications, ABOUT 111 GIRLS follows an Iranian bureaucrat on his quest to

Above and Below

Directed by Nicholas Steiner

Nicolas Steiner’s sublime exploration of lives lived on the fringe is set in a seemingly apocalyptic world that happens to

Adama

Directed by Simon Rouby

The year is 1916. Adama is 12-years-old and lives in a remote West African village. When his elder brother Samba

Aferim!

Directed by Radu Jude

Jude won Best Director at the Berlin Film Festival for this visionary historical epic — a European “Eastern” to an

After the Storm

Directed by Hirokazu Kore-Eda

In Kore-eda’s latest domestic drama, Ryota (Hiroshi Abe), a novelist who struck it big with his first tome, struggles to

Agnès Varda Shorts Program One

Directed by Agnès Varda

A trio of shorts from Varda’s early career saw her expanding her cinematic palette after La Pointe Courte, her 1955

Agnès Varda Shorts Program Three

Directed by Agnès Varda

Six shorts from the mid-70s up through the early aughts, capturing Varda at her unpredictable and charming best. This program

Agnès Varda Shorts Program Two

Directed by Agnès Varda

Four early-mid-career Varda shorts—two exploring varieties of love and two from her late-60s trip to California—craft unforgettable portraits of very

Aguirre, the Wrath of God

Directed by Werner Herzog

Championed by Roger Ebert as one of the top ten films of all time, Klaus Kinski plays the titular madman

Akira

Directed by Katsuhiro Ohtomo

Ohtomo’s influential work reinvigorated Western interest in Japanese anime and still feels cutting-edge to this day. Adapting the voluminous cyberpunk

Ali: Fear Eats the Soul

Directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Fassbinder, who in his own way was always examining social norms and systems, here takes on the twin issues of

Alice Guy-Blaché Solax Shorts

Directed by Alice Guy-Blaché

Alice Guy-Blaché, the first woman filmmaker, came up during the Belle Époque period in Paris around the turn of the



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.