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Amandi

Directed by Francesc Sitges-Sardà, Elisabet Prandi

A blend of nature, woods, and weird landscapes featuring two characters in constant transformation

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Amauros 3

Directed by Nicole Seiler

Audio description makes films accessible to visually impaired audiences by describing the visual elements of the work. By removing the

Ballet Spiral

Directed by Sam Asaert

An eerie journal through a frozen moment of ballet.

Balletlujah

Directed by Grant Harvey

Produced by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Balletlujah celebrates the music of one of Canada's--and now Portland's--most iconic artists, k.d. lang,

Birds

Directed by David Hinton

Birds do the dancing in this found footage film.

CANCELLED: Breakin’

Directed by Joel Silberg

As the first widely released breakdancing film, Breakin' is a cultural milestone that reeks of 1980s cash-in cinema culture, from

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Chant En Fugue

Directed by Lombard Twins

The Lombard Twins dancing in the streets of Manhattan.

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Cold Light Day

Directed by Dayna Hanson

In this dreamy dance film, two men exchange cake and dance steps on a quiet marina dock.

Continuum

Directed by Natalianne Boucher

Our perception of time and its connection with space is explored in movement through the symbolism of shifting sand.

Cracks

Directed by Alex Pachon

A soloist dances to the sounds of his own joints cracking and popping.

Crystals of Transformation

Directed by Fuchsia Lin

The energetic environment of water affects its molecular structure.

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Dance of the Neurons

Directed by Jody Oberfield, Eric Siegel

Twenty four dancers embody the birth of neurons, activating the brain/body.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.