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Bye Bye Germany

Directed by Sam Garbarski

Garbarski’s film offers a humorous and moving look at Jewish life in postwar Germany. Frankfurt, 1946: David Bermann is a

Sun, Jan 19

California Split

Directed by Robert Altman

Pro gambler Charlie (Elliot Gould) and novice Bill (George Segal) form a unique bond in Robert Altman’s New Hollywood ode

Camera Shy

Directed by Mark Sawers

Larry (Nicolas Wright) is an unprincipled city councilman who doesn’t mind a little fraud and infidelity if it advances his

Camouflage

Directed by Krzysztof Zanussi

Versed in philosophy and physics, renowned writer-director Krzysztof Zanussi injects wit and humor into his acerbic portrait of conformity. In

Carmen from Kawachi

Directed by Seijun Suzuki

A 1960s riff on the opera Carmen (including a rock version of its famous aria “Habanero”), this picaresque tale sends

Cemetery of Splendour

Directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul

A hypnotic cinematic dreamscape unfolds in Thai master Weerasethakul’s new film, in which soldiers with a mysterious sleeping sickness are

Champagne

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

CHAMPAGNE stars the bubbly Betty Balfour as a frivolous flapper whose millionaire father looks to teach her a lesson in

Charade

Directed by Stanley Donen

Legendary director Stanley Donen takes on the Hitchcockian thriller (of sorts) with the madcap Charade, starring Audrey Hepburn and Cary

Chevalier

Directed by Athina Rachel Tsangari

“While on a fishing trip in the Aegean Sea, six men decide to play Chevalier, a game that measures every

Childhood Machine

Directed by Sean Whiteman, Christof Whiteman

Filmmaking siblings the Whiteman brothers’ off-center comedic style takes flight in this story of a brilliant and enigmatic inventor with

Christmas in Connecticut

Directed by Peter Godfrey

Released shortly before the end of World War II, this hearty, charming Warners rom-com asks: To what lengths should one

City Lights

Directed by Charlie Chaplin

Chaplin, neverendingly empathetic to his characters—and thus to their real-world counterparts, usually the poor and downtrodden of American society—crafted perhaps