Viola

Beginning with Viola, director Matías Piñeiro embarked upon a cinematic exploration of Shakespeare’s “light” comedies, transmuting plays like Twelfth Night, As You Like It and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (this year’s forthcoming Hermia & Helena) into the lives and loves of modern Argentine youth. In Viola, the titular character is a bike courier for a bootleg DVD service, and, echoing her shipwrecked counterpart in Twelfth Night, finds herself existentially adrift. While running errands in the city, Viola falls in with members of a theatre troupe rehearsing an all-female pastiche of Shakespeare’s plays and is invited to join the cast. Shot almost exclusively in close-ups of the actresses’ faces (eminently watchable, one and all), the film’s fluid, unhurried pacing belies the complexity of the stories, emotions, and relationships glimpsed just below the surface, after the cut, or outside of the frame. “In film after film, Piñeiro has increasingly perfected this act of magic, and Viola is his most outstanding film to date.”—Cinemascope. In Spanish with English subtitles.

Genres: Drama

Other Films by Matías Piñeiro

The Princess of France

The Princess of France

Shifting focus from the women of Viola to the elliptical love affairs of a young man, the third entry in Piñeiro’s ongoing Shakespeare series is a loose adaptation of Love’s Labours Lost. In the original play a king and his men decide to swear off romance for three years (with predictably unsuccessful results); in The