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The Whitsell Auditorium and the Northwest Film Center Equipment Room are closed to the public in an effort to further stem the spread of COVID-19. All classes canceled until further notice. Stay connected to art, film, and more by signing up for our newsletter.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

United States 1958 128 mins. In English

Topping Sight & Sound’s most recent critics’ poll of the 50 greatest films of all time, this 1958 psychological thriller was considered a critical and box office failure in its initial release. Hitchcock casts Jimmy Stewart against type as a traumatized, former San Francisco cop turned gumshoe whose chance encounter with a mysterious woman (Kim Novak) spins him into a world of mystery and obsession, forcing him to grapple with both unchecked desire and a yearning for complete control over her. Vertigo is a Technicolor nightmare, imbued with dark implications and a riddle that only grows with each subsequent viewing. As an artifact of 20th-century filmmaking, the film is unparalleled in its depiction of erotic fixation, relentless in its pessimism, and completely devoid of redemption for the characters contained within it. “Hitchcock is daring us to leap. He has prepared the ultimate fix for a cinema junkie: a movie to get lost in.“—Peter Travers, Rolling Stone.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.