Skip to content

Directed by Sam Pollard

United States 2015 80 mins. In English

In June, 1964, college students from throughout the country, impassioned by the civil rights movement, traveled to Mississippi in what would be known as Freedom Summer. That same month, two separate groups of musicians, students, and record collectors also arrived in Mississippi. Though neither group was aware of the other, each had come on the same mission: to find an old blues singer who since recording in the 1930s, had be lost to time. Thirty years before, Son House and Skip James had recorded some of the most memorable music of their era, but where were they now? The telling of how their parallel quests collided in the mix of social activism revisits a watershed moment in American culture, ever relevant in an era continuing to wrestle with police brutality, voting rights, social justice and the legacy of the blues. Narrated by Common and featuring music by Gary Clark Jr., Buddy Guy, Lucinda Williams, Valerie June, the North Mississippi Allstars, and more.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.