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Directed by Helena Ahonen, Max Andersson

Sweden 2013 77 mins. In Swedish, German, Serbian, English

To promote their comic book Bosnian Flat Dog, Swedish artists Max Andersson and Lars Sjunnesson toured the countries of the former Yugoslavia with a mummified Marshal Tito in a refrigerator. Now comes the documentary, which takes Super-8mm footage of their tour and animates it with cardboard cutouts, garbage, and other recycled materials. The result is a surreal trip through the Balkans that is part promotion, part performance art, and part history of Marshal Tito and the dissolution of Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. Through it all, there is a comics creator’s eye at work. Live-action interviews suddenly switch to animation, which is like moving from one panel to the next in a comic book. Altogether, a joyous trip through the war-torn subconscious of an underground artist.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.