The Princess of France

Shifting focus from the women of Viola to the elliptical love affairs of a young man, the third entry in Piñeiro’s ongoing Shakespeare series is a loose adaptation of Love’s Labours Lost. In the original play a king and his men decide to swear off romance for three years (with predictably unsuccessful results); in The Princess of France, a theater director named Victor returns to Argentina after some time away and finds himself pulled among the many women he’d left behind. As he assembles his cast for a radio performance of Love’s Labours Lost—wandering all the while through art galleries, recording studios, and apartments—he passes easily and without passion from one romance to the next. In typical Piñeiro fashion, the characters, relationships, and narrative structure are left intentionally ambiguous, making it a rambling sojourn through the bourgeois lifestyle of contemporary middle-class Argentine youth. “For Piñero’s characters, Shakespeare isn’t just a creative challenge; it establishes the rules of their universe, even as their director expertly breaks them by forging a new path.”—Indiewire. In Spanish with English subtitles.

Genres: Drama, Romance

Other Films by Matías Piñeiro

Viola

Viola

Beginning with Viola, director Matías Piñeiro embarked upon a cinematic exploration of Shakespeare’s “light” comedies, transmuting plays like Twelfth Night, As You Like It and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (this year’s forthcoming Hermia & Helena) into the lives and loves of modern Argentine youth. In Viola, the titular character is a bike courier for a