The Pleasure Garden

Hitchcock’s first film, shot in Germany and on location in Italy at Lake Como, is set in the world of seedy London nightclubs. Two young dancers, one celebrated, the other finding her way, take intertwined paths to romantic tragedy. The first of several Hitchcock films about women putting faith in men they don’t really know—to perilous effect—THE PLEASURE GARDEN also offers hints of the visual flourishes and thematic obsessions later to become iconic. Alma Reville served as the film’s assistant director (one of 19 films of his she worked on over 50 years), and the story goes that Hitchcock proposed to her after the shooting wrapped.

Genres: Thriller, Drama

Other Films by Alfred Hitchcock

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Easy Virtue

The tyrannies of polite British society come under scrutiny in this adaptation of Noël Coward’s stage hit of the same name. Adapted by Eliot Stannard, who scripted most of Hitchcock’s silent films, EASY VIRTUE offers an early example of one of Hitchcock’s favorite themes: the “wrong man”—in this case, woman. After Larita Filton is unjustly

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The Manxman

In a remote fishing village on the Isle of Man, two boyhood friends—one a lawyer, the other a fisherman—are torn apart when they discover they are in love with the same woman—smolderingly sensual Anny Ondra, whom Hitchcock also cast in his suspense masterpiece BLACKMAIL. Shooting in Cornwall, Hitchcock makes striking use of the dramatic natural

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Champagne

CHAMPAGNE stars the bubbly Betty Balfour as a frivolous flapper whose millionaire father looks to teach her a lesson in frugality by letting her think he’s gone bankrupt. The movie brims with sight gags, with a swaying camera mimicking the roll of an ocean liner to generate several humorously queasy moments. But the comedy also

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Downhill

“DOWNHILL mixes cynical humor with sexual horror as it tracks star rugby player Roddy’s descent from upstanding British schoolboy to Montmartre gigolo, the downhill road laid for him by a series of scheming women. Hitchcock’s formal audacity is on flamboyant display in false flashbacks, upside-down POV shots, and massive foreground objects dwarfing the characters behind

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The Ring

“THE RING fascinates because it is not a suspense film and yet experiments with the tropes through which Hitchcock created suspense. There’s something that Raymond Durgnat summed up as ‘petty, edgy, unnerving’ here. The setting is the world of boxing in which hungry amateurs vie with professional prizefighters for money, status, and love. A young