The Mirror

The most visually poetic and personal of Tarkovsky’s films, THE MIRROR has no conventional plot. Rather, the film takes the viewer on a chronological journey through the memories—real and imagined—of an unnamed narrator who lies dying of cancer. The seemingly random images create a melancholic montage of the mundane events of our lives through which we search for spirituality and truth. Employing the same actors in several different roles throughout the film and leaving many questions unanswered, Tarkovsky deflected attempts to over-explain the film, urging viewers to accept it as a simple autobiographical reflection. “I should like to ask you all not to be so demanding… It is no more than a straightforward, simple story. It doesn’t have to be made any more understandable.”

Genres: Experimental

Other Films by Andrei Tarkovsky

Nostalghia

Russian master Tarkovsky’s penultimate film, shown here on the occasion of its 30th anniversary, follows Yankovskiy (Andrei Gorchakov), a poet who falls in with a Tuscan madman (Erland Josephson) while traveling through Italy and researching the life of an 18th-century Ukrainian composer who spent his final years there. Yankovskiy, increasingly isolated from those around him,

Ivan’s Childhood

During World War II, young Ivan (Nikolay Burlyaev) scurries across Soviet and German lines, having been recruited as a spy by Russian forces. Via vivid dream and flashback sequences, the film grants us glimpses of what this orphaned child had before war rendered everything a cold, war torn landscape bereft of comfort. Tarkovsky’s first film

The Sacrifice

Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is generally considered to be the greatest director of post-war Soviet cinema and the last of the European Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is generally considered to be the greatest director of post-war Soviet cinema and the last of the European art-film generation. Full of deep spiritual and ecological concern and possessing an intensely