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The Whitsell Auditorium and the Northwest Film Center Equipment Room are closed to the public in an effort to further stem the spread of COVID-19. All classes canceled until further notice. Stay connected to art, film, and more by signing up for our newsletter.

Directed by Martin Sulík

Slovakia, Czech Republic 2018 113 mins. In German, Slovak, Russian, English with English subtitles

80-year-old translator Ali Ungár comes across a book written by a former SS officer recounting his war experiences in Slovakia, and realizes that one of the chapters may well describe his own parents’ execution. Armed with a pistol, he sets off to Vienna to look for the man and enact his revenge—but once there, the only person he encounters is the man’s 70-year-old son Georg, a former teacher who has spent his whole life avoiding his father and suffering from alcohol addiction. The translator’s visit arouses Georg’s curiosity, and he decides to invite Ali on a trip through Slovakia. But while Georg is basically out to have a good time, Ali hopes to find out how his parents really died. Gradually, these two very different men begin to warm to each other and together, they discover a country that would prefer to forget about its past. Oscillating between comedy and tragedy, Martin Šulík’s road movie focuses on two old men weighed down by the unresolved conflicts that have plagued their lives—who are now trying to free themselves from this oppressive burden. Jiří Menzel (legendary director of films such as Closely Watched Trains) plays the role of the gloomy and worldly-wise Ali, Peter Simonischek (Toni Erdmann) is the maverick Georg.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.