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Directed by Robert Altman

United States 1969 In English

THAT COLD DAY IN THE PARK displayed Altman’s iconoclastic fascinations: a sensitivity to schisms within normalcy, a fascination with female subjectivity, and the construction of atmospheres as expressive of psychological states. Sandy Dennis portrays Frances Austen, a young spinster living in a well-appointed apartment in Vancouver, where she listlessly entertains an older suitor and engages in dull domestic routines. From her window one day, Frances spies a young man on a park bench outside, visibly cold and wet. Inviting him inside, she shows the handsome, apparently mute stranger every hospitality—food, clothes, conversation, and a room. Little does she realize that her guest has a complex life of his own, to which he escapes nightly through his bedroom window. The stage is set for conflict as Frances’s loneliness takes on a ferocity that drives the story to a harrowing conclusion.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.