Strangers on a Train

Tennis pro Guy Haines is in a bad marriage when he’s approached by a perfect stranger, Bruno (Robert Walker), who idly contemplates the perfect murder. Bruno speculates that if he gets Guy’s wife out of the way, then Guy could take care of Bruno’s untenable father and each could have an alibi for the murder they’d be suspected of and no discernable motive for the crime they committed. “Bruno’s manner is pushy and insinuating, with homoerotic undertones . . . not a psychological study, however, but a first-rate thriller with odd little kinks now and then.”—Roger Ebert.

Genres: Drama, Mystery, Crime

Other Films by Alfred Hitchcock

Easy Virtue

The tyrannies of polite British society come under scrutiny in this adaptation of Noël Coward’s stage hit of the same name. Adapted by Eliot Stannard, who scripted most of Hitchcock’s silent films, EASY VIRTUE offers an early example of one of Hitchcock’s favorite themes: the “wrong man”—in this case, woman. After Larita Filton is unjustly

The Manxman

In a remote fishing village on the Isle of Man, two boyhood friends—one a lawyer, the other a fisherman—are torn apart when they discover they are in love with the same woman—smolderingly sensual Anny Ondra, whom Hitchcock also cast in his suspense masterpiece BLACKMAIL. Shooting in Cornwall, Hitchcock makes striking use of the dramatic natural

The Pleasure Garden

Hitchcock’s first film, shot in Germany and on location in Italy at Lake Como, is set in the world of seedy London nightclubs. Two young dancers, one celebrated, the other finding her way, take intertwined paths to romantic tragedy. The first of several Hitchcock films about women putting faith in men they don’t really know—to

Champagne

CHAMPAGNE stars the bubbly Betty Balfour as a frivolous flapper whose millionaire father looks to teach her a lesson in frugality by letting her think he’s gone bankrupt. The movie brims with sight gags, with a swaying camera mimicking the roll of an ocean liner to generate several humorously queasy moments. But the comedy also

Downhill

“DOWNHILL mixes cynical humor with sexual horror as it tracks star rugby player Roddy’s descent from upstanding British schoolboy to Montmartre gigolo, the downhill road laid for him by a series of scheming women. Hitchcock’s formal audacity is on flamboyant display in false flashbacks, upside-down POV shots, and massive foreground objects dwarfing the characters behind