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Directed by Various

Films in this Program

Aubade

Directed by Mauro Carraro

In a surrealist, backlit scene, swimmers and birds witness the spectacle of the dawn, hypnotized by the music of a

My Own Personal Moose

Directed by Lenoid Shmelkov

Misha, a quiet, dreamy boy, has his fantasy come true: to meet a real elk. The film conjures up the

The Shirley Temple

Directed by Daniela Sherer

An abstract narrative about childhood and adulthood, escapism, and sexuality.

Timber

Directed by Nils Hedinger

A group of logs freezing in the snow work out how they can stay warm.

The Bigger Picture

Directed by Daisy Jacobs

Life-size animated characters tell the stark and darkly humorous tale of caring for an elderly parent.

The Wound

Directed by Robert Lobel

A little girl’s resentment, embodied in a shaggy creature that becomes her best friend, starts to completely control her life.

Wind

Directed by Robert Lobel

About the daily life of people living in a windy area who seem helplessly exposed to the weather. The inhabitants

365-One Year. One Film. One Second a Day.

Directed by The Brothers McLeod

Illustrator Greg and writer Myles produced one second of animation every day for a year. No storyline, script or storyboard—just

Through the Hawthorn

Directed by Anna Benner, Pia Borg, Gemma Burditt

Three characters, three perspectives, three directors: A session between a psychiatrist, a schizophrenic patient, and his mother. A triptych exploring

Yearbook

Directed by Bernardo Britto

A man is hired to compile the definitive history of human existence before the planet blows up.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.