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Directed by Masaki Kobayashi

Japan 1967 121 mins. In Japanese

This stunning meditation on honor, duty, justice, and love, set in the 18th century, stars the magnificent Toshirô Mifune as Isaburo, a renowned swordsman who takes an heroic but deadly stand for individual freedom. Isaburo is the essence of samurai loyalty until his daughter-in-law is commandeered as mistress for his overlord. The injustice moves him toward a revolt raging with power and emotion. “Everything builds to a climactic bloodletting, and the point of the violence is not so much its kinetic exhilaration as its tragic inevitability. Travis Bickle (TAXI DRIVER) might well recognize the profoundly alienated warrior as his ancestor.”—Terrence Rafferty, The New York Times. Winner of the Kinema Jumpo Award for Best Japanese Film of 1967.

Genres: Drama, Historical

Appears in: Samurai Cinema



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.