Only Angels Have Wings

Hawks’ fourth film about air-bound transit stars Cary Grant as Geoff Carter, a pilot for a small airline whose main task is delivering the mail to and from a remote camp in the foothills of the Andes. Carter manages several other pilots who repeatedly take massive risks due to the treacherous terrain and the limitations of their aircraft. Bonnie (Jean Arthur) appears in the tiny outpost and, realizing the senselessness by which the men act, quickly becomes their moral compass. But when Carter’s outfit has the opportunity to secure a huge contract at great risk, the unit is forced to face a choice: immediate safety or earning a living. In a world where everyone around them stoically faces their own mortality on a daily basis, Bonnie and Carter become entangled due to their refusal in the end to uphold the status quo.

Restored in 4k digital from the original nitrate picture negative and composite duplicate negative by Sony Pictures Entertainment at Colorworks.

Genres: Drama, War, Romance

Other Films by Howard Hawks

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His Girl Friday

One of the most famous products to come out of Columbia Pictures during its late-’30s/early-’40s heyday, His Girl Friday is a model of wisecracking, fast-paced dialogue directly springing from its screwball forebears of the ’30s (in particular Frank Capra’s Columbia films). Walter Burns (an effervescent Cary Grant) is a newspaper editor whose ex-wife Hildy Johnson

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Rio Bravo

John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson team up in this idiosyncratic take on the “singing cowboy” Western from the ever-versatile Howard Hawks. When aging Sheriff John T. Chance (Wayne), who oversees a very small, unnamed Western town, arrests and jails accused murderer Joe Burdette (Claude Akins), Burdette’s brother Nathan vows revenge and hires guns

BFI Southbank, Howard Hawks season. January 2011

The Big Sleep

One of the key noirs of the 1940s, The Big Sleep features several legends of the American page and screen—Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, Howard Hawks, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner, and Leigh Brackett—collaborating on a messy masterpiece that, fittingly, lacks traditional narrative logic but more than makes up for it with dripping atmosphere and fine performances.