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Directed by Various

United States 2015 90 mins.

More than just a staff show-and-tell, we celebrate short films by Northwest Film Center faculty and staff. The program includes A Year & A Day by Pam Minty, a series of images of Bond Butte taken monthly over the course of a year and then the same butte taken hourly on one day; Baling Baling by Lawrence Johnson captures the efforts of famers in Bali to keep the birds away with rhythmic noisemakers, plastic bags, and scarecrows; Slacker Cats by Paul Harrod, a pilot demo for a proposed animated WB Network series; June by Lee Krist, an early 21st century visual memoir of Portland shot on 35mm slides; Landing Ship X-1 by Dave Hanagan, in which two space traverlers explore a desolate planet and discover a glam rock icon; Light’s Journey by Mark Eifert, a meditation on our presence in the cosmos; Mango by Geoff Peterson, in which a confident psychic challenges a skeptic’s beliefs; Out of This World by Melissa Tvetan, an investigation of sex and string theory, promiscuity and parallel dimensions; Spooky Action at a Distance by Stephanie Hough, which offers a look at the unsettling nature of affected action—feeling home and lost simultaneously; The Rough Rider by Jarratt Taylor Aline follows an effort to make it to the state Wrestling Championship; Picture by Amy Beth O’Brien, sometimes a picture is worth more than a thousand words; and Unrequited by Andrew Price, in which an amateur science fiction writer finds himself torn between two worlds.

Genres: Short

Appears in: Northwest Tracking



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.