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In accordance with the recent mandate from Oregon Governor Kate Brown, masks are required during Open-Air Cinema at OMSI. Masks continue to be required for all staff and visitors at the Portland Art Museum, including Venice VR Expanded.

Directed by Ildikó Enyedi

Hungary, West Germany, Cuba 1989 102 mins.

Budapest, 1880: twins Lili and Dora are born, nearly simultaneously with Thomas Edison’s invention of the light bulb—a key piece of cinema history. This genesis moment for modernity provides the backdrop to Enyedi’s whimsical story of the two young women, who are split up at a young age after their mother’s death and take on entirely different life trajectories: Dora becomes a hedonistic courtesan, Lili a militant revolutionary. Operating in the same proximity, however, the two both become embroiled with the mysterious figure of Z, a man of shadowy history and even darker motives. Through luminous black-and-white photography and thickly surreal passages of pure imagination, Enyedi weaves an intoxicating tale, one that garnered her the Golden Camera award (best first feature) at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival and helped put Hungary on the world cinema map.

Genres: Drama, Fantasy



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.