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Directed by Mikhail Kalatozov

Cuba, USSR 1964 141 mins. In Spanish with subtitles

New 4k digital restoration! For a film ostensibly dealing with the Cuban Revolution, and produced essentially as Communist propaganda, I Am Cuba has somehow managed to transcend those typically drab descriptors to remain one of the most innovative films ever made. More impressionistic than plot-driven, Kalatozov’s detailed-yet-freewheeling look at Cuba of the late-50s and early-60s—made in collaboration with the Russian poet Evgeniy Evtushenko and cinematographer Sergey Urusevskiy (The Cranes are Flying, Letter Never Sent)—is a startling vision of a country in flux, especially 50+ years later as Cuba opens to the West.  “Undeniably monstrous and breathtakingly beautiful, ridiculous and awe inspiring, I Am Cuba confounds so many usual yardsticks of judgment that any kind of star rating becomes inadequate…to put it simply, the world doesn’t make allowances for a freak of this kind.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.