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Directed by Mikhail Kalatozov

Cuba, USSR 1964 141 mins. In Spanish with subtitles

New 4k digital restoration! For a film ostensibly dealing with the Cuban Revolution, and produced essentially as Communist propaganda, I Am Cuba has somehow managed to transcend those typically drab descriptors to remain one of the most innovative films ever made. More impressionistic than plot-driven, Kalatozov’s detailed-yet-freewheeling look at Cuba of the late-50s and early-60s—made in collaboration with the Russian poet Evgeniy Evtushenko and cinematographer Sergey Urusevskiy (The Cranes are Flying, Letter Never Sent)—is a startling vision of a country in flux, especially 50+ years later as Cuba opens to the West.  “Undeniably monstrous and breathtakingly beautiful, ridiculous and awe inspiring, I Am Cuba confounds so many usual yardsticks of judgment that any kind of star rating becomes inadequate…to put it simply, the world doesn’t make allowances for a freak of this kind.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum.