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Directed by Lisa Jackson

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 2013 60 mins.

VISITING ARTIST—The Gwa’sala and the ‘Nakwaxda’xw First Nations people lived as two distinct groups along Canada’s northwest coast. In 1964, the Canadian government forcibly relocated them from their traditional territories to the Tsulquate reserve near Port Hardy on Vancouver Island and burned their villages. Candid and moving interviews, striking archival footage—including their early contact with Franz Boas and Edward S. Curtis—and a visit to their stunning homelands portray a journey of healing. Jackson brings to life the story of a people known for their theatrical dances, strong connection to the land, and the strength that enabled them to overcome incredible hardships.

Genres: Documentary



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.