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The Whitsell Auditorium and the Northwest Film Center Equipment Room are closed to the public in an effort to further stem the spread of COVID-19. All classes canceled until further notice. Stay connected to art, film, and more by signing up for our newsletter.

Directed by Various

United States 2015 117 mins.

This program presents a selection of experimental works from the 1960s, made by some of the foremost practitioners of the personal cinema style that reached its early peak during this period. Included in the program are: Robert Enrico’s Incident at Owl Creek Bridge (1962), an award-winning adaptation of Ambrose Bierce’s Civil War story of a martial hanging gone awry; Arthur Lipsett’s Very Nice, Very Nice (1961), a rapid-fire, mid-20th-century slice-of-modern-life portrait; Bruce Conner’s A Movie (1958), an idiosyncratic, free-associative collage with—of course—movies as its target; Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising (1963), a legendary occult-biker mythological tale piercing the cult of male celebrity; Stan Brakhage’s Scenes from Under Childhood Section One (1967), the filmmaker’s vision of his children’s view of the world; and George Kuchar’s Hold Me While I’m Naked (1966), one of Kuchar’s finest works, an exploration of sexual isolation with a twist.



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.