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Directed by Terrence Malick

United States 1979 94 mins.

Set against the landscape of early-20th century industrial Chicago and subsequently the rippling grain fields of the Texas Panhandle (in actuality central Canada), Malick’s immense tragedy follows lovers-masquerading-as-siblings Abby (Brooke Adams) and Bill (Richard Gere), who travel south in search of steady work but instead become embroiled in a complex, morally questionable love triangle with a nameless farm patriarch (Sam Shepard). Director Terrence Malick won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director Awards and Nestor Almendros won the Oscar for Best Cinematography for—in the words of film historian Peter Biskind—this “dark jewel of a film.”



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.