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Claire’s Camera

  • Directed by Hong Sang-soo
  • South Korea/France, 2017, 70 mins., Korean/French/English

One of three films by Hong Sang-soo in this year’s festival, Claire’s Camera was shot during the Cannes Film Festival while actresses Isabelle Huppert and Kim Min-hee were there to present other films. Manhee (Min-hee) plays a film sales agent whose life takes a turn when she runs into Claire (Huppert), a teacher who loves taking photographs of everyone she meets with her Polaroid camera. Claire’s photos kick-start a chain of events fueled by chance, alcohol, and wry humor. “The eternal question of whether cinema, and art in general, can make a difference in people’s lives gets a light-hearted affirmative answer in [this] breezy celebration of the mysterious power of filmmaking.” —Hollywood Reporter. In Korean, French, and English with subtitles.

Filmography: Yourself and Yours (2016), Right Now, Wrong Then (2015), Hill of Freedom (2014), Our Sunhi (2013), Nobody’s Daughter Haewon (2013), In Another Country (2012), The Day He Arrives (2011), Night and Day (2008), Woman on the Beach (2006), Woman Is the Future of Man (2004)

Reviews: The House Next Door, Film Comment (round-up), Cinema Scope, Variety, Hollywood Reporter

Genres: Drama

Other Films by Hong Sang-soo

On the Beach at Night Alone

“Hong Sang-soo’s movies have always invited autobiographical readings, and this is perhaps his most achingly personal film yet, a steel-nerved, clear-eyed response to the tabloid frenzy that erupted in South Korea over his relationship with actress Kim Min-hee. The film begins in Hamburg, where actress Young-hee (played by Kim herself, who won the Best Actress

The Day After

Once again plumbing affairs of the heart and the foibles of weak, confused men with his sly humor, Hong Sang-Soo’s third film of the year shifts back and forth in time and between its protagonists’ conflicting perspectives. We find Areum on her first day of work for small-book publisher Bongwan, replacing his just-fired mistress whose

Nobody’s Daughter Haewon

Why does Seoul student Haewon keep dozing off? Is she depressed by her mother’s departure for Canada? Tired of her relationship with her teacher, the fickle—and married—filmmaker Seongjun? Will the events of the coming weeks rouse her from her listlessness, or will she carry on dreaming? With its focus on fraught male-female relationships, mix of

Yourself and Yours

“Hong Sangsoo boldly and wittily explores the painful caprices of modern romance. Painter Youngsoo hears that his girlfriend, Minjung, has recently had (many) drinks with an unknown man. A quarrel seems to end their relationship. The next day, Youngsoo sets out in search of her, at the same time that Minjung—or a woman who looks

Right Now, Wrong Then

Film director Ham arrives in Suwon a day early for a screening and speaking engagement. Roaming about, he meets a much younger artist named Yoon and they spend the day together in conversation, winding up at a café where things turn awkward. Hong then rewinds the story, telling it again with subtle differences and a