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The Whitsell Auditorium and the Northwest Film Center Equipment Room are closed to the public in an effort to further stem the spread of COVID-19. All classes canceled until further notice. Stay connected to art, film, and more by signing up for our newsletter.

Directed by Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė

Lithuania 2018 62 mins. In Lithuanian, English, German, French, Finnish with subtitles

The Curonian Spit, situated on the Baltic Sea on the border between Lithuania and Russia, is one of the world’s most macabre tourist destinations, owing to its masses of downed pine trees. Beyond the apocalyptic look of the forest, flocks of cormorants (large black birds somewhat vulture-like in appearance) also roost in this scenic place, overseeing the damage. Barzdžiukaitė’s ingeniously perceptive film provides a literal and figurative overview of the forest, and through her focus on often-hilarious tourist reactions to the ecological situation, Acid Forest unearths myriad ideas about environmental catastrophe and the mass media’s effect on our perception of the world. “Beguiling, beautiful and informative.” —Kaleem Aftab, Cineuropa.

Filmography: First feature

Sponsored by Laurynas R. Misevicius Agency and Randolph Miller, Diplomatic Consul to the Republic of Lithuania



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.