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3 Women

Robert Altman made a long career out of films that challenged the idea that actions stemming from rampant consumerism or the vile effects of toxic masculinity were in any way natural. With 3 Women, Altman delivers one of his finest artistic statements, charting the relationship between three broken women: Millie Lammoreaux (Shelley Duvall), who works at a convalescent home for the elderly; Pinky Rose (Sissy Spacek), a new arrival to their California desert town who ingratiates herself with Millie; and Willie Hart (Janice Rule), a pregnant artist and and landlord’s wife. As Millie shows Pinky the ropes, the two women’s lives begin to intertwine in strange ways, while Millie strikes up a sordid relationship with the landlord, drawing Willie into a dark web. “3 Women is a daring piece of cinema that glides along the edge of weirdness and somehow manages not to fall off. And I’ve never seen a film that’s more poetic and accurate about the radical extent that the human personality will bend and morph in an effort to cleave to its object of desire.”—Eric Henderson, Slant Magazine.

Genres: Drama, Mystery

Other Films by Robert Altman

That Cold Day in the Park

THAT COLD DAY IN THE PARK displayed Altman’s iconoclastic fascinations: a sensitivity to schisms within normalcy, a fascination with female subjectivity, and the construction of atmospheres as expressive of psychological states. Sandy Dennis portrays Frances Austen, a young spinster living in a well-appointed apartment in Vancouver, where she listlessly entertains an older suitor and engages

Brewster McCloud

Following his enormously successful M*A*S*H, Brewster McCloud, with its deliberately faltering beginning and wandering narrative line, took a determinedly different direction. It tells the story of a boy (Bud Cort) who yearns to fly. Hiding out in the Houston Astrodome under the mentorship of a bird woman (Sally Kellerman), he builds a pair of life-size

The Long Goodbye

As a tribute to, or perhaps in contempt of, the noir detective story, Altman subverts genre convention by re-imagining the usually hard-boiled character of Philip Marlowe as a nebbish private eye. Elliot Gould plays Marlowe, who digs himself deep into trouble when he decides to investigate the murder of a friend. Based on the book

Short Cuts

Adapting several short stories by the Pacific Northwest author Raymond Carver and transplanting them to a bristling early-90s Los Angeles, Altman deploys his trademark restless camera coupled with overlapping, densely layered sound to concentrate on the idea of the American family in the Reagan-Bush era while exploring dominant notions of masculinity and marital fidelity.  As