3 Women

3 Women is often under-appreciated among Altman’s films, yet it remains one of his most fascinating. Shelly Duvall was nominated for the Best Actress award at Cannes for her portrayal of Millie Lammoreaux, a happily, and perhaps purposefully, naïve young woman who meets the shy and introverted Pinky Rose, portrayed by Sissy Spacek. The two women become incidental friends at their mutual workplace and decide to live as roommates. When a desperate turn of events forces a reversal of roles between them, layers of identity and character are slowly peeled back, revealing delicate truths.

Appears in: Special Screenings

Genres: Drama, Mystery

Other Films by Robert Altman

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That Cold Day in the Park

THAT COLD DAY IN THE PARK displayed Altman’s iconoclastic fascinations: a sensitivity to schisms within normalcy, a fascination with female subjectivity, and the construction of atmospheres as expressive of psychological states. Sandy Dennis portrays Frances Austen, a young spinster living in a well-appointed apartment in Vancouver, where she listlessly entertains an older suitor and engages

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Brewster McCloud

Following his enormously successful M*A*S*H, Brewster McCloud, with its deliberately faltering beginning and wandering narrative line, took a determinedly different direction. It tells the story of a boy (Bud Cort) who yearns to fly. Hiding out in the Houston Astrodome under the mentorship of a bird woman (Sally Kellerman), he builds a pair of life-size

1973, THE LONG GOODBYE

The Long Goodbye

As a tribute to, or perhaps in contempt of, the noir detective story, Altman subverts genre convention by re-imagining the usually hard-boiled character of Philip Marlowe as a nebbish private eye. Elliot Gould plays Marlowe, who digs himself deep into trouble when he decides to investigate the murder of a friend. Based on the book

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Short Cuts

Adapting several short stories by the Pacific Northwest author Raymond Carver and transplanting them to a bristling early-90s Los Angeles, Altman deploys his trademark restless camera coupled with overlapping, densely layered sound to concentrate on the idea of the American family in the Reagan-Bush era while exploring dominant notions of masculinity and marital fidelity.  As