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January 1, 2019 – December 31, 2019

Fri, May 24
Sat, May 25
Sun, May 26

Babylon

Directed by Franco Rosso

After premiering at the 1980 Cannes Film Festival, Babylon was a controversial film upon initial release in the UK, receiving

Fri, May 31
Sat, Jun 1
Sun, Jun 2

Yours in Sisterhood

Directed by Irene Lusztig

Very important in the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st—but certainly not without its detractors—Ms. magazine

Fri, Jul 19
Sat, Jul 20
Sat, Jul 20
Sun, Jul 21

Diamantino

Directed by Gabriel Abrantes, Daniel Schmidt

One of the year’s most out-there conceptual works, Diamantino is an eye-opening and thoroughly hilarious experience. The film tracks the

500 Years

Directed by Pamela Yates

Completing her epic trilogy about Guatemala, which launched with When the Mountains Tremble (1983), a film that contributed to the

78/52

Directed by Alexandre O. Philippe

After six decades, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) remains one of the touchstones of world cinema and its shower scene remains

A Bread Factory Part One & Two

Directed by Patrick Wang

When a ragtag theatre troupe and community arts space in the lightly fictional town of Checkford, New York has their

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail

Directed by Steve James

The incredible saga of the Chinese immigrant Sung family, owners of Abacus Federal Savings of Chinatown, New York, elicits both

Amateur

Directed by Hal Hartley

Hartley’s neo-noir is a languid, at times claustrophobic work in which an amnesiac with a checkered past (Martin Donovan), the

Araby

Directed by Affonso Uchôa, João Dumans

Andre (Murilo Caliari) is an aimless teenager in southeastern Brazil, taking care of his sickly brother and riding his bike

Bight of the Twin

Directed by Hazel Hill McCarthy

Bight of the Twin, an experimental visual and musical journey, tells the story of musician and artist Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Bisbee ’17

Directed by Robert Greene

In 1917, Bisbee, Arizona, was witness to a heinous, violent, racist event: the expulsion of 1,200 immigrant copper miners who

Blow-Up

Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Antonioni’s landmark film set a new course for the cinema with its stylistic flourishes, jazzy score by Herbie Hancock, and

Crime + Punishment

Directed by Stephen Maing

First-time documentary feature director Stephen Maing trains his camera on a group of NYPD officers—all people of color—who have been

Dark Money

Directed by Kimberly Reed

As is widely known at this post-Citizens United stage of democracy in the United States, big, untraceable money plays a

Dawson City: Frozen Time

Directed by Bill Morrison

Like his elegant Decasia (2002) and The Great Flood (2012), Dawson City is a hypnotic mashup of narrative cinema filtered

Dial M for Murder

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

A fading tennis pro (Ray Milland), fearing he is losing his wife (Grace Kelly)—and most of all her money—to another

Dolores

Directed by Peter Bratt

The dynamic speaker Cesar Chavez first comes to mind when considering the decades of work of the United Farmworkers Union

Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day

Directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder

This eight-hour, five-episode intimate epic follows toolmaker Jochen (the magnetic Gottfried John) and his extended family (Fassbinder regular Hanna Schygulla)

En El Séptimo Dia

Directed by Jim McKay

In McKay’s first feature effort since 2004’s Everyday People (he has also directed episodes of critically acclaimed television shows like

Ex Libris

Directed by Frederick Wiseman

Frederick Wiseman’s 42nd documentary brings his incisive vision to of one of the world’s greatest institutions of learning, capturing the

Faces Places

Directed by Agnès Varda, JR

Much as she did with her much-loved classic The Gleaners and I (2000), this whimsical yet profound road trip through

Granito: How To Nail A Dictator

Directed by Pamela Yates

Sometimes a film doesn’t just document history, it makes history. Such is the case with Granito. Part political thriller, part

Hale County This Morning, This Evening

Directed by RaMell Ross

Written, directed, shot, and edited by first-time feature filmmaker RaMell Ross, Hale County is one of this year’s most gripping

Kusama: Infinity

Directed by Heather Lenz

Lenz’s revealing documentary follows the fine artist Yayoi Kusama, now in her 80s, on a kaleidoscopic journey through her history

Le Corbeau

Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot

Clouzot’s controversial, claustrophobic film noir, set in a small countryside hamlet referred to as “anywhere,” follows the small-town doctor Germain

Matangi/Maya/M.I.A.

Directed by Stephen Loveridge

Mathangi "Maya" Arulpragasam (aka M.I.A.) is one of the music world’s most controversial and politically outspoken artists, having created an

Mrs. Hyde

Directed by Serge Bozon

Bozon’s (Tip Top, La France) latest, a wild adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famed novel, stars Isabelle Huppert as Mrs.

No Man’s Land

Directed by David Byars

In January 2016, a well-armed band of anti-government militants led by the sons of renegade rancher Cliven Bundy took control

Nocturama

Directed by Bertrand Bonello

Bonnello’s (Saint Laurent) latest provocation is a film in two distinct and gripping parts: first, a procedural in which we

One Sings, the Other Doesn’t

Directed by Agnès Varda

Varda’s mid-career film, dripping in garish ’70s color schemes, is a paean to female friendship and solidarity. The friendship of

Psycho

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

“Phoenix, $40,000, car lot, traffic cop, Bates Motel, taxidermy, keyhole, shower, knife: every cinephile has committed these details to memory,

Quai des Orfèvres

Directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot

Often overshadowed by the earlier controversy of Le Corbeau (1943) and the later unimpeachable masterpieces The Wages of Fear (1953)

Quest

Directed by Jonathan Olshefski

One of the year’s most incisive, tender portraits of the average life of Americans, Olshefski’s debut follows the Raineys, an

Rat Film

Directed by Theo Anthony

Anthony’s debut feature is a clear-eyed, probing examination of twin issues both historically and currently affecting the city of Baltimore:

Scarred Hearts

Directed by Radu Jude

Based loosely on the writings of the Romanian dissident Max Blecher (1909-1938), Scarred Hearts follows the young Emmanuel (Lucian Teodor Rus), a

Score: A Film Music Documentary

Directed by Matt Schrader

What makes a film score unforgettable? How does the creative process between directors and composers come together? Tracing key developments

Strangers on a Train

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Tennis pro Guy Haines is in a bad marriage when he’s approached by a perfect stranger, Bruno (Robert Walker), who

The Central Park Five

Directed by Sarah Burns, David McMahon, Ken Burns

Based on Sarah Burns's powerful book and co-directed by her husband, David McMahon, and father, Ken Burns, their film tells

The Force

Directed by Peter Nicks

Winner of the Documentary Directing Award at the Sundance Film Festival, Peter Nicks (The Waiting Room) spent two years embedded

The Great Silence

Directed by Sergio Corbucci

Aficionados of the genre consider Corbucci’s (the original 1996 Django) homage to be among the masterworks, inspiration to Alex Cox,

The Illinois Parables

Directed by Deborah Stratman

Stratman’s latest feature—following such crucial works as O’er the Land (2009)—is an 11-part historical compendium, comprised of discrete stories of

The Last Movie

Directed by Dennis Hopper

A legendary film maudit made in the wake of the smash success of Hopper’s directorial debut Easy Rider (1969), The

The Owl’s Legacy

Directed by Chris Marker

After making many essay film masterpieces in the 1960s and 1970s, Chris Marker turned increasingly to television in the 1980s,

The Reagan Show

Directed by Pacho Velez, Sierra Pettengill

Our current president wasn’t the first to ride media and celebrity fame to the White House. Ronald Reagan transitioned from

Trust

Directed by Hal Hartley

Adrienne Shelly and Martin Donovan unforgettably star in Hal Hartley’s sophomore feature, a Long Island-set comic romance that takes full

Wanda

Directed by Barbara Loden

Barbara Loden’s sole feature film is a heartbreaking peek inside one average woman’s life circa 1970 as she bounces from

When the Mountains Tremble

Directed by Pamela Yates

When the Mountains Tremble remains a compelling testimony to the struggle of the largely Mayan Indian population in . In

Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin

Directed by Arwen Curry

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929–2018) is one of America’s finest writers. Early in her career, she sought to break the