Reel Music Festival 31

  • October 11, 2013 — October 27, 2013

Welcome to our 31st edition of Reel Music. We’ve been on the lookout all year for new works—and timely classics—for this annual celebration of sound and image, music and culture, and the origins of sounds infused in our experience. Whether your passion is jazz, blues, rock, soul, folk, funk, or punk, we hope you find this mixture of old and new, familiar and strange, to be full of inspiration and discovery.

Overlapping, and part of, Reel Music is “The Hitchcock 9,” recent restorations of all of Alfred Hitchcock’s surviving early silent films, accompanied by live performance by some of Portland’s finest musical talents. As always, our special thanks go to Music MillenniumWillamette WeekOregon Music NewsKINK.fmMusicFestNWAll Classical PortlandKIND Healthy SnacksKZMEWalkerKMHDPDX Pipeline Yelp!Portland Radio Project and PosterChild McMenamins for helping make it all happen. Enjoy.

PLEASE NOTE: All films at The Mission Theater are 21 and over only. The box office opens one hour prior to showtime.

Muscle Shoals

Directed by Greg 'Freddy' Camalier

In a small Alabama town called Muscle Shoals—on the banks of the Tennessee River—legendary musicians including Aretha Franklin and Wilson

The Punk Singer

Directed by Sini Anderson

Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre, was a pivotal figure in the

The Savoy King: Chick Webb and the Music That Changed America

Directed by Jeffrey Kaufman

Born poor in Baltimore, Chick Webb broke his back as a boy and faced life as a hunchback dwarf afflicted

Blackmail

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s last silent film, generally hailed as the finest British film of the decade, was quickly refashioned into his first

The Lodger

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock called his third feature “the first true Hitchcock movie.” His first foray into the thriller genre, THE LODGER introduced

This Ain’t No Mouse Music!

Directed by Chris Simon, Maureen Gosling

VISITING ARTISTS—As a teenager in 1947, Chris Strachwitz migrated from Germany to the United States, where he saw a film

Charles Lloyd: Arrows Into Infinity

Directed by Dorothy Darr, Jefferey Morse

Charles Lloyd became one of the most popular and influential jazz musicians of the 1960s when his album “Forest Flower”

Sing Me the Songs That Say I Love You: A Concert for Kate McGarrigle

Directed by Lian Lunson

In this hybrid documentary and concert film tribute to the great Canadian folk singer (1946-2010), candid interviews with McGarrigle’s family

Magical Mystery Tour

Directed by Francis Hanly

Buoyed by the earlier success of A HARD DAY’S NIGHT and the triumphant success of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club

The Farmer’s Wife

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

“Alfred Hitchcock was worried that the stage roots of THE FARMER’S WIFE…might show through in his film adaptation. It was

Made in Portland: Selections from the Portland Music Video Festival

Directed by Various

Music videos are the ultimate marriage of art and commerce; a breeding ground for up-and-coming filmmakers experimenting with their craft;

The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle

Directed by Julien Temple

“To be bad is good. To be good is simply boring.”—Malcolm McLaren. The urge to self-mythologize is written into rock’s DNA.

Lisztomania

Directed by Ken Russell

In his flamboyant, anachronistic style, Russell transposes the excesses of 1970s superstardom onto Franz Liszt (played by Roger Daltrey), while

Approximately Nels Cline

Directed by Steven Okazaki

Best known as the lead guitarist of Wilco and one of the most adventurous musicians on earth, Nels Cline is

Born in Chicago

Directed by John Anderson

BORN IN CHICAGO chronicles a uniquely musical passing of the torch as it tells two interlocking stories. First, how white,

The Ring

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

“THE RING fascinates because it is not a suspense film and yet experiments with the tropes through which Hitchcock created

Babe’s and Ricky’s Inn

Directed by Ramin Niami

From 1957 to its closing in 2007, Laura Mae Gross’s legendary South Central Los Angeles blues club was ground zero

Charlie “Bird” Parker, 1920-1955

Directed by Jan Horne

Produced by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, Jan Horne’s four-part film on the life of jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker is the

Mistaken for Strangers

Directed by Tom Berninger

About to take off on their “High Violet” world tour, The National front man Matt Berninger decides to hire his

Finding the Funk

Directed by Nelson George

FINDING THE FUNK is a road trip in search of the past, present, and future of funk music. Starting with

Bayou Maharajah

Directed by Lily Keber

The Ivory Emperor, the Black Liberace, Lil Booker, Little Chopin in Living Color...James Carroll Booker III. BAYOU MAHARAJAH explores the

Downhill

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

“DOWNHILL mixes cynical humor with sexual horror as it tracks star rugby player Roddy’s descent from upstanding British schoolboy to

Video Musics III: Floating Oceans

Directed by Alexis Gideon

Portland musician, animator, and filmmaker Alexis Gideon combines all these interests in his stop-motion animated video operas. FLOATING OCEANS explores

Brothers Hypnotic

Directed by Reuben Atlas

For the eight young men in the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble, “brotherhood” is literal: they’re all sons of anti-establishment jazz legend

The Great Flood

Directed by Bill Morrison

THE GREAT FLOOD is a film-music collaboration inspired by the catastrophic Mississippi River Flood of 1927 and the ensuing transformation

Mean Streets

Directed by Martin Scorsese

Based in part on his own experiences in the darker corners of New York’s Little Italy, Scorsese provides a parable

Champagne

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

CHAMPAGNE stars the bubbly Betty Balfour as a frivolous flapper whose millionaire father looks to teach her a lesson in

The Pleasure Garden

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s first film, shot in Germany and on location in Italy at Lake Como, is set in the world of

The Manxman

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

In a remote fishing village on the Isle of Man, two boyhood friends—one a lawyer, the other a fisherman—are torn

Easy Virtue

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

The tyrannies of polite British society come under scrutiny in this adaptation of Noël Coward’s stage hit of the same