Italian Style

  • March 7, 2015 — March 21, 2015

After World War II, Italian neo-realism emerged as the most appreciated cinema in the world. The great films of Luchino Visconti, Roberto Rossellini, and Vittorio De Sica turned eyes to Italy and set the stage for a new generation of filmmakers looking beyond the gloom and economic tragedy of the era and toward the issues and opportunities of modern industrialized society. The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.


La Dolce Vita

Directed by Federico Fellini

Fellini’s emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome is a seductive meditation on what was truly meaningful (if anything)


Roman Holiday

The first Hollywood film to be shot and produced on location in Italy, Roman Holiday made Audrey Hepburn an enduring

ROME: Fashion designer Valentino poses for a portrait shoot for Sunday Telegraph Fashion Rome on May 22, 2007. (Photo by Lorenzo Agius/Contour by Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Valentino

Valentino: The Last Emperor

Directed by Matt Tyrnauer

Shot by Vanity Fair Correspondent Matt Tyrnauer between 2005 and 2007, Valentino: The Last Emperor, offers an intimate and engaging,



Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

Antonioni’s meditation on meaning in modern existence remains an obligatory experience in existential cinema-going. On a yachting trip off Sicily,


Juliet of the Spirits

Directed by Federico Fellini

The female counterpoint to 8½, Fellini ventures deeply into the surreal as Juliet of the Spirits explores the repressed desires



Directed by David Lean

Jane (Katharine Hepburn), a lonely American spinster on vacation in Venice and hoping to find romance, succumbs to a passionate,

Annex - Bogart, Humphrey (Barefoot Contessa, The)_02

The Barefoot Contessa

Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Humphrey Bogart plays Harry Dawes, a recovering alcoholic film director who plucks simple nightclub dancer Maria Vargas (Ava Gardner) out


Le Amiche

Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni

In Le Amiche (Italian for girlfriends), a young woman returns to her hometown of Turin after World War II to


Il Sorpasso

Directed by Dino Risi

Classically mismatched co-stars Vittorio Gassman and Jean-Louis Trintignant embark on a wildly reckless ride in an iconic Lancia Aurelia convertible