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Ingmar Bergman: A Centenary Celebration

  • June 1, 2018 – July 22, 2018

Ingmar Bergman (1918–2007) stands as one of the giants of world cinema and perhaps the father of the flowering of art house movement in America during the 1960s and ’70s. After a career as a melodrama journeyman in the postwar Swedish film industry, his creative and popular breakthroughs came with Summer with Monika (1953) and Smiles of a Summer Night (1955), which firmly established him with European critics and audiences. Widespread American acclaim came with The Seventh Seal (1957), which for many remains his most celebrated contribution to film history. This selection of some of his greatest works feature new digital restorations courtesy of Janus Films and the Swedish Film Institute.

Fri, Jun 1
Sat, Jun 2
Sun, Jun 3

The Seventh Seal

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

For many Bergman’s most iconic work, The Seventh Seal is a parable on religion and mortality. When the knight Antonius

Fri, Jun 8
Sat, Jun 9

Wild Strawberries

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Continuing his reckoning with death, Wild Strawberries (in Sweden a symbol of protection and safety) dramatizes one man’s remarkable voyage

Fri, Jun 8
Sat, Jun 9

Through a Glass Darkly

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Bergman’s first serious foray into examining family trauma and dysfunction follows a young family to remote Fårö Island. Family patriarch

Sat, Jun 9

Hour of the Wolf

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Despite having toyed with aspects of psychological horror in prior films such as The Silence and Persona, Hour of the

Fri, Jun 15
Mon, Jun 25

Persona

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

One of Bergman’s most famous and audacious experiments in a career filled with piercing character studies and psychological realism unparalleled

Fri, Jun 22
Sat, Jun 23

Cries and Whispers

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Harriet Andersson gives one of her greatest performances as the agonized sister Anna, tortured by illness to the brink of

Fri, Jun 29
Sat, Jun 30

Winter Light

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

The second in his “Faith Trilogy,” Winter Light chronicles a day in the life of a disillusioned village pastor (Gunnar

Sat, Jun 30
Sun, Jul 1

The Magic Flute

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Bergman’s adaptation of Mozart’s opera—the tale of a young man determined to rescue a beautiful princess from the clutches of

Sun, Jul 1
Thu, Jul 5

The Magician

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

When a 19th-century traveling medicine show makes its way into town, the locals subject its performers to a battery of

Fri, Jul 6
Sun, Jul 8

The Silence

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

“The third film in his ‘Faith Trilogy,’ The Silence offers a sexually frank depiction of two emotionally conjoined sisters who,

Sat, Jul 7
Sun, Jul 8

Sawdust and Tinsel

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

“Bergman presents the battle of the sexes as a ramshackle, grotesque carnival in one of the late master's most vivid

Wed, Jul 11
Sun, Jul 15

Shame

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Musicians Jan (Max Von Sydow) and Eva (Liv Ullmann), take refuge in a remote farmhouse hoping to escape the coming

Fri, Jul 13
Sat, Jul 14

Autumn Sonata

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Bergman’s only collaboration with Swedish film legend Ingrid Bergman, Autumn Sonata serves as a complimentary, yet more melancholy parallel to

Sat, Jul 14
Sun, Jul 15

Smiles of A Summer Night

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

The inspiration for Woody Allen’s A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy and Steven Sondheim’s A Little Night Music, Bergman’s Smiles is

Fri, Jul 20
Sun, Jul 22

The Virgin Spring

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Bergman returns to the medieval Sweden of The Seventh Seal with this decidedly modern parable based on a 14th-century religious

Sat, Jul 21
Sun, Jul 22

Summer with Monika

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

Originally regarded as an erotic exploitation film, Monika enjoyed reappraisal as Bergman gained international recognition. Here he first articulates his

Sat, Jul 21

Fanny and Alexander

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

With his most pronounced cinematic meditation on childhood and memory, Ingmar Bergman abandons the expressionistic and existentially obsessive tendencies that