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September 11, 2015 – October 16, 2015

Our inaugural Friday Film Club discussion series—presented monthly when the Portland Art Museum’s galleries are open late on Friday evenings—features works with implicit or explicit focus on landscape: rural and urban, physical and emotional. Presented in conjunction with the Museum’s “Seeing Nature” exhibition, on view October 10-January 8, we hope these films will spark dialogue, both between audience members and between artistic mediums. The screenings are accompanied by post-film discussions led by a Museum docent, sometimes with a short exhibition tour component.

Days of Heaven

Directed by Terrence Malick

Set against the landscape of early-20th century industrial Chicago and subsequently the rippling grain fields of the Texas Panhandle (in

In the Mood for Love

Directed by Wong Kar-Wai

A tiny, sparsely populated slice of early-1960s Hong Kong forms the backdrop for Wong’s hyper-stylish yet thorny dissection of the

Taste of Cherry

Directed by Abbas Kiarostami

Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival and celebrated as the critical rival of his own

The Great Northwest

Directed by Matt McCormick

Portland filmmaker Matt McCormick’s film is inspired by—and recreates—a 3,200-mile road trip made in 1958 by four Seattle women who



The Northwest Film Center recognizes and honors the Indigenous peoples of this region on whose ancestral lands the museum now stands. These include the Willamette Tumwater, Clackamas, Kathlemet, Molalla, Multnomah and Watlala Chinook Peoples and the Tualatin Kalapuya who today are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, and many other Native communities who made their homes along the Columbia River. We also want to recognize that Portland today is a community of many diverse Native peoples who continue to live and work here. We respectfully acknowledge and honor all Indigenous communities—past, present, future—and are grateful for their ongoing and vibrant presence.