Absurdly Human: The Films of Roy Andersson

  • July 10, 2015 — July 20, 2015

“Life is a tragedy. There’s no happy end for any of us. We all die. But there’s a lot of comedy in it. There’s comedy and vulnerability . . . I’m trying to show what it’s like to be human.”—Roy Andersson. Hailed by the Toronto International Film Festival as “the most distinctive Swedish filmmaker since Ingmar Bergman, Roy Andersson’s biting, idiosyncratic films—droll, absurd, observational comedies—delight as they surface both the nightmare and joy of human existence.” Leading up to the Portland premiere of his newest film, A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, which won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, we are pleased to offer an Andersson primer, a retrospective of three of the four meticulously crafted features that have established his singular place in international cinema. Though his output of only five feature films over 45 years may be considered modest by one standard, the achievement is grand and singular. Thanks to Magnolia Pictures, Kino International, and the Co-production Office for providing the films.


A Swedish Love Story

Directed by Roy Andersson

Andersson’s first feature, his thesis project at the Swedish Film Institute, was a great critical and popular success in his


Songs from the Second Floor

Directed by Roy Andersson

Anderson won the Grand Prize at the Cannes Film Festival for this first part of a “trilogy about being a


You, the Living

Directed by Roy Andersson

You, the Living hilariously explores man’s existence, behavior, thoughts, worries, happiness, sorrow, and a profound longing for validation and love


A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence

Directed by Roy Andersson

Winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, Andersson’s new film mirrors a bird’s panoramic perspective of the