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2017 on Celluloid

  • January 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017

A quick look at all of the films we’re screening on celluloid throughout 2017.

Sat, Jul 21

Fanny and Alexander

Directed by Ingmar Bergman

With his most pronounced cinematic meditation on childhood and memory, Ingmar Bergman abandons the expressionistic and existentially obsessive tendencies that

2001: A Space Odyssey

Directed by Stanley Kubrick

The most legendary and widely discussed film of the 1960s, and Kubrick’s most famous work in a string of masterpieces,

42nd Street

Directed by Lloyd Bacon, Busby Berkeley

During the early 1930s, Warner Bros. churned out a series of “backstage musicals” featuring complex choreography by the legendary Busby

A New Leaf

Directed by Elaine May

May, as one half of the legendary comedy team Nichols and May, established herself as a comedic powerhouse on stage

Almayer’s Folly

Directed by Chantal Akerman

With Almayer’s Folly, Akerman tackles the terrible legacy of the European colonial project in Southeast Asia head-on through an adaptation

American Madness

Directed by Frank Capra

Producer Harry Cohn made Columbia Pictures one of the key studios of the early 1930s, perhaps the greatest purveyor of

Angels of Sin

Directed by Robert Bresson

Bresson’s first feature hints at the themes for which his later films would become famous: isolation, suffering, martyrdom, and the

Baby Face

Directed by Alfred E. Green

One of the most historically renowned pre-code films, Baby Face is the type of film Warner Bros. was so good

Back Street

Directed by John M. Stahl

Under Carl Laemmle Jr.’s steady leadership, Universal in the 1930s produced a slew of social-issue dramas that were pitched slightly

Bamboozled

Directed by Spike Lee

Routinely overshadowed by Lee’s better-known films (Do the Right Thing, She’s Gotta Have It, Malcolm X, et al.), Bamboozled is

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Directed by Benh Zeitlin

A deeply felt exploration of race and class in post-Katrina America filtered through the soaring fantasies and downcast reality of

Bicycle Thieves

Directed by Vittorio De Sica

De Sica’s social drama, along with Roberto Rossellini’s Rome, Open City, is the most emotionally engaging film of the Italian

Bombshell

Directed by Victor Fleming

Under the leadership of the tragic figure Irving Thalberg, by 1933 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was the house of Hollywood glamour, producing sophisticated,

Casque d’or

Directed by Jacques Becker

In this tragic adult fairytale, set in the criminal underworld of Belle Époque Paris, Georges (Serge Reggiani), a humble woodworker,

Crooklyn

Directed by Spike Lee

Spike Lee’s sentimental remembrance of growing up in 1970s Brooklyn centers on a young girl named Troy (Zelda Harris) as

Dead Man

Directed by Jim Jarmusch

Few cinematic collaborations have been more perfectly cast than Dead Man, Jarmusch’s legendary, incendiary “psychedelic Western.” The film follows William

Dune

Directed by David Lynch

Famed producers Dino and Rafaella De Laurentiis took a chance on Lynch directing Dune, after the beloved novel by Frank

Employees’ Entrance

Directed by Roy Del Ruth

Warner Brothers during the late silent era and the 1930s was a true industrial machine, churning out product at a

Eraserhead

Directed by David Lynch

Is the twisted child of Henry Spencer (Jack Nance) a metaphor for the paternal anxiety this new father is experiencing?

Fish Tank

Directed by Andrea Arnold

With the arrival of her 2009 sophomore film, Academy Award-winning director Andrea Arnold (Red Road, American Honey) cemented herself as

Footlight Parade

Directed by Lloyd Bacon, Busby Berkeley

Busby Berkeley’s last of three “backstage musicals” made at Warner Bros. in 1933 is the delightful, somewhat overshadowed Footlight Parade,

Gabriel Over the White House

Directed by Gregory La Cava

During the depths of the depression, President Judson Hammond (Walter Huston) sides against workers and offers up uninspired political doctrine

George Washington

Directed by David Gordon Green

Green’s debut feature masterfully captures the essence of childhood summers spent with kids your own age, free from parental supervision,

Gold Diggers of 1933

Directed by Mervyn LeRoy, Busby Berkeley

Busby Berkeley’s second of three “backstage musicals” for Warner Bros. in 1933 was the fabled Gold Diggers of 1933, which

Heroes for Sale

Directed by William A. Wellman

Wellman's pessimistic 1933 film presents the story of Tom Holmes (Richard Barthelmess), a soldier whose heroism on the battlefield is

Ikiru

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Kanji Watanabe (Takashi Shimura), a lowly, stuck, middle-aged bureaucrat, falls ill with cancer and has less than a year to

Inland Empire

Directed by David Lynch

“A woman in trouble,” says Inland Empire’s poster tagline. Lynch took several years, following the success of Mulholland Drive, to

Irma Vep

Irma Vep

Directed by Olivier Assayas

A twin portrait of both the acclaimed Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung as well as the French film industry as

It’s a Gift

Directed by Norman McLeod

By 1934, W.C. Fields was at the top of his game, enormously popular in the US after a long string

Ivan’s Childhood

Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky

During World War II, young Ivan (Nikolay Burlyaev) scurries across Soviet and German lines, having been recruited as a spy

James and the Giant Peach

Directed by Henry Selick

Based on Roald Dahl's delightfully dark children's story, Selick’s (Coraline) imaginative film tells the tale of an unhappy orphaned boy

La Strada

Directed by Federico Fellini

Perhaps Fellini’s greatest film, La Strada straddles his early neorealist period and his later magical and fantastical work, combining elements

La Vie de Jesus (The Life of Jesus)

Directed by Bruno Dumont

Since his 1997 debut with The Life of Jesus, Bruno Dumont has become one of European cinema’s most unsettling and provocative auteurs,

Le samouraï

Directed by Jean-Pierre Melville

For many Jean-Pierre Melville’s best film if not masterpiece, Hong Kong action film legend John Woo once called Le Samouraï

Lolita

Directed by Stanley Kubrick

Lolita began the string of masterpieces that form the second half of Kubrick’s career, through which he became one of

Lost Highway

Directed by David Lynch

While many of Lynch’s films work with the tropes and atmospheres of film noir, few are so directly in the

M. Hulot’s Holiday

Directed by Jacques Tati

Tati’s second feature introduces the beloved character Monsieur Hulot, the bumbling, charming, near-silent uncle figure at the heart of his

Man’s Castle

Directed by Frank Borzage

Frank Borzage developed a successful career as a silent film director at 20th Century Fox with such films as Seventh

Mulholland Drive

Directed by David Lynch

Mulholland Drive, conceived as a television series in the Twin Peaks lineage and shot as a feature-length pilot episode, was

Psycho

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

“Phoenix, $40,000, car lot, traffic cop, Bates Motel, taxidermy, keyhole, shower, knife: every cinephile has committed these details to memory,

Ratcatcher

Directed by Lynne Ramsay

Taking place during a 1970s garbage strike in Glasgow, Lynne Ramsay’s Ratcatcher follows young James (William Eadie) who lives in

Rear Window

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

One of the most famous procedural thrillers in film history and routinely voted amongst the greatest films ever produced, Rear

Rules of the Game

Directed by Jean Renoir

Although it was met with diverse responses when it was released, few films have earned such universal critical acclaim as

Seed

Directed by John M. Stahl

Stahl, a master of the melodrama often situated as the proto-Douglas Sirk, made his second picture of 1931 with the

Show Me Love

Directed by Lukas Moodysson

Elin (Alexandra Dahlstrom) lives in the unremarkable small town Åmål, a fact over which she despairs to anyone who will

Sullivan’s Travels

Directed by Preston Sturges

Sturges made a career on exquisitely rendered comedies with a strongly humanistic drive—and perhaps nowhere does this alchemical mixture come

Sunset Boulevard

Directed by Billy Wilder

Down-on-his-luck screenwriter Joe Gillis (William Holden) seeks refuge at the home of former silent film star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson,

Suspiria

Directed by Dario Argento

Suzy, a young dancer, arrives at a remote ballet academy and discovers that one of the students has been brutally

Swimming To Cambodia

Directed by Jonathan Demme

“It would be wrong to think of Swimming to Cambodia as a one-man show, even though it captures the performance

The Agronomist

Directed by Jonathan Demme

Jonathan Demme’s career as a feature filmmaker was paralleled by personal documentaries focusing on music and human rights, with a

The Decameron

Directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini

The first of three “tales of life"—to be followed by his adaptations of The Canterbury Tales and Arabian Nights—Pasolini’s take

The Elephant Man

Directed by David Lynch

Surreptitiously produced by none other than Mel Brooks, Lynch’s haunting, macabre, and beautiful vision of Victorian London was—following the cult

The Goonies

Directed by Richard Donner

A band of pre-teen friends who live in the “Goon Docks” neighborhood in Astoria attempt to save their homes from

The Learning Tree

Directed by Gordon Parks

Based on his own autobiographical novel, The Learning Tree was, according to Roger Ebert, the first non-exploitation feature film made

The Night of the Hunter

Directed by Charles Laughton

Charles Laughton, who made his name as a wide-ranging character actor in Hollywood (famed for his roles in such films at

The Reflecting Skin

Directed by Philip Ridley

Someone has been abducting and murdering children in a rural 1950s American town. Seth (Jeremy Cooper) and the other boys

The Spirit of the Beehive

Directed by Victor Erice

A traveling roadshow of the film Frankenstein comes to the small, Franco-era village where eight-year-old Ana (Ana Torrent), her sister

The Story of Temple Drake

Directed by Stephen Roberts

Produced at Paramount at a time when the studio was floundering under financial hardship, The Story of Temple Drake is

The Straight Story

Directed by David Lynch

“Walt Disney presents...a film by David Lynch.” Stranger words have perhaps never opened an American film, but the belief in

The Tree of Life

Directed by Terrence Malick

In what was only his fifth feature in almost 40 years, the reclusive director Terrence Malick sets the lives of

The White Balloon

Directed by Jafar Panahi

Winner of the Camera D’Or and International Critics Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Panahi’s first foray into narrative filmmaking,

The White Ribbon

Directed by Michael Haneke

Something dire is transpiring just below the surface of a charming, pre-World War I German village. A horse and rider

The Wizard of Oz

Directed by Victor Fleming

In 1939, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was at the height of its powers as a studio producing the most lavish films in Hollywood.

Vertigo

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Topping Sight & Sound’s most recent critics’ poll of the 50 greatest films of all time, this 1958 psychological thriller

Walkabout

Directed by Nicholas Roeg

Abandoned by their father in the Australian Outback, a teenaged girl (Jenny Agutter) and her young brother (Luc Roeg) wander

Wild at Heart

Directed by David Lynch

The promise of love in a violent world ripples under the surface of the unhinged Wild at Heart, in which

Working Girls

Directed by Dorothy Arzner

Dorothy Arzner was the only female—let alone out lesbian—filmmaker working at a major Hollywood studio in the 1920s and ’30s,

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

Directed by Dušan Makavejev

A tragic figure in the history of psychiatry, Wilhelm Reich is often credited with sparking the fire of the sexual