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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   


(RE)DISCOVERIES: NEW RESTORATIONS, NEW PRINTS

32ND REEL MUSIC FESTIVAL

VOICES IN ACTION: HUMAN RIGHTS ON FILM

NORTHWEST TRACKING

SPECIAL SCREENINGS


Wes's World: Wes Anderson and His Influences
   HAROLD AND MAUDE
   RUSHMORE
   JULES AND JIM
   THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS
   THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS
   BREWSTER MCCLOUD
   BOTTLE ROCKET
   THE LAST DETAIL
   THE 400 BLOWS
   CANCELLED SHOW: VOYAGE TO THE EDGE OF THE WORLD
   THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU
   FITZCARRALDO
   THE RIVER
   THE DARJEELING LIMITED
   THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS
   THE TALE OF THE FOX
   FANTASTIC MR. FOX
   KING KONG
   MOONRISE KINGDOM
   BLACK JACK
   SMALL CHANGE
Wes's World: Wes Anderson and His Influences

While Wes Anderson has become one of the most internationally heralded directors over the last decade, his quirky, meticulous films have remained a few steps removed from the mainstream spotlight. The breakthrough success of his recent THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL provides an opportunity for a retrospective look of his earlier work and some of the key films that influenced his own. Anderson’s intricately detailed worlds demand rapt attention to pick up the myriad of cultural references, emotions hidden beneath layers of artifice, and trenchant explorations of familial ties. Marked by energetic soundtracks and collaboration with a cast of regulars in front of and behind the camera—among them cinematographer Robert Yeoman, composer Mark Mothersbaugh of the band Devo, and actors Owen and Luke Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray, Angelica Huston, Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody, and Edward Norton—Anderson’s films have at once much to say about the bygone times they portray and about our modern condition and the bonds we must forge to stay sane in this crazy world.

Double feature pricing applies to all film pairings in this series—add the second film for only $5!



Sat, Jul 12, 2014
at 4:45 PM

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HAROLD AND MAUDE
DIRECTOR: HAL ASHBY
US, 1971

A classic of the much-mythologized New American Cinema of the 1970s, HAROLD AND MAUDE follows Harold (Bud Cort), a moneyed yet death-obsessed 19-year-old, and Maude (Ruth Gordon), a lively 79-year-old, who fall in love after meeting at a stranger’s funeral. Harold can’t enjoy life; his mother (Vivian Pickles) forces him into dates with women his own age, but he finds increasingly creative ways to shrug them off. Through a series of off-the-wall teachings, Maude shows Harold what it means to be happy and how to make the most of life. But as this unconventional relationship blooms and Harold announces his intention to marry Maude, one of her firmly held beliefs threatens to cut short their time together. (91 mins.)

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Sat, Jul 12, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Jul 13, 2014
at 4:45 PM

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RUSHMORE
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 1998

RUSHMORE was Anderson’s first commercial and critical breakthrough, earning its place as one of the key works of the American independent film movement of the 1990s. The memorable protagonist is extracurricular overachiever but academic underachiever Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman), a clever yet bumbling student at the prestigious, private Rushmore Academy. As Max attempts to romance Ms. Cross (Olivia Williams), a recently widowed teacher at Rushmore, he falls in with tycoon Herman Blume (Bill Murray), and the three find themselves embarking on one of the most ill-fated love triangles ever put to film. While Max begins as a confident, know-it-all teen, the film’s examination of youthful alienation, misplaced desire, and subsequent growth ushers him into something more closely resembling adulthood. (93 mins.)

Shawn Levy, author and film critic for KGW, will introduce the film on Saturday evening.


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Sun, Jul 13, 2014
at 7 PM

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JULES AND JIM
DIRECTOR: FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT
FRANCE, 1962

One of the French New Wave’s great period pieces and one of Truffaut’s greatest love stories, JULES AND JIM offers a nostalgic look at a ménage à trois that begins before World War I and concludes with the outbreak of National Socialism. In between these landmark historical events, this magical adaptation of the Henri-Pierre Roche novel takes shape. The story of two men who share a romantic relationship with the same woman is based on Truffaut’s reflection that “the couple is not a satisfying concept, but is there an alternative?” Starring Oskar Werner, Henri Serre, and Jeanne Moreau, the film is a lyrical character study that celebrates freedom, love, loyalty, and life at its most passionate and tragic. (105 mins.)

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Fri, Jul 25, 2014
at 6:30 PM

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THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1942

Following the success of CITIZEN KANE, Welles made one of the most famously disastrous productions of the 1940s, the story of a wealthy family unable to adapt to the changing times in the years following the Industrial Revolution. Despite the fact that Welles lost control of the editing of the film (which had a full hour of footage cut by the studio) when he left to shoot his ill-fated Latin American film IT’S ALL TRUE, THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS—narrated by Welles and starring regular collaborators Joseph Cotten and Agnes Moorehead—remains one of the classics of the Hollywood studio era. (88 mins.)

Matt Zoller Seitz, film critic, editor-in-chief of RogerEbert.com, and author of THE WES ANDERSON COLLECTION (2013), will introduce the film.


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Fri, Jul 25, 2014
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Jul 26, 2014
at 6 PM

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THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 2001

Anderson fashions a fully-realized, baroque world populated by the eccentric Tenenbaum clan, a family of morose ex-wunderkinds, now adrift in harsh reality and led by Royal (Gene Hackman), who has just been unceremoniously kicked out of his hotel dwelling. Upon hearing of his ex-wife Etheline’s (Anjelica Huston) engagement to her accountant Henry (Danny Glover), Royal tries to convince her and his children that he has stomach cancer in a bid to win back their love. Through this scheme, the family is reunited—ex-playwright Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow), shrewd businessman Chas (Ben Stiller), and former tennis prodigy Richie (Luke Wilson) return home to grapple with their own ideas of family and tormented pasts. (110 mins.)

Matt Zoller Seitz, film critic, editor-in-chief of RogerEbert.com, and author of THE WES ANDERSON COLLECTION (2013), will introduce the film on Friday evening, July 25.


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Sat, Jul 26, 2014
at 8:30 PM

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BREWSTER MCCLOUD
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US, 1970

Following his enormously successful M*A*S*H, BREWSTER MCCLOUD, with its deliberately faltering beginning and wandering narrative line, took a determinedly different direction. It tells the story of a boy (Bud Cort) who yearns to fly. Hiding out in the Houston Astrodome under the mentorship of a bird woman (Sally Kellerman), he builds a pair of life-size wings. Brewster’s world is disrupted, however, by the arrival of a detective investigating the mystery of several guano-covered corpses. Altman parodies such films as THE BIRDS, BULLITT, and THE WIZARD OF OZ (the Wicked Witch herself, Margaret Hamilton, stars in a minor role), while exploring a young boy’s dreams of freedom and flight in the sociopolitical bounds of Nixon’s America. (105 mins.)

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Thu, Jul 31, 2014
at 8 PM

BOTTLE ROCKET
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 1996

An expansion of his short film made at the University of Texas, Anderson’s first feature signaled a unique fusion of offbeat visual storytelling and infectious soundtrack. Anthony (Luke Wilson) “escapes” from a voluntary mental hospital with the aid of his childhood friend Dignan (Owen Wilson). Dignan wants to impress local hood Mr. Henry (James Caan) by robbing a bookstore and getting out of small-town Texas and drags Anthony and their wealthy friend Bob Mapplethorpe (Robert Musgrave) along with him. On the run, they end up at a roadside motel where Anthony falls for maid Inez and causes a rift between his cronies. But one final job, a heist at a local cold storage facility, makes them all realize that they need each other more than they thought. (91 mins.)

Screening in the series Top Down @ The Hotel deLuxe. $9 general; $8 student/senior/Portland Art Museum member; $6 Silver Screen Club Friend. Tickets at the door are $11 general; $10 student/senior/PAM member; $8 Silver Screen Club Friend.

PURCHASE ADVANCE TICKETS

 


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Fri, Aug 1, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE LAST DETAIL
DIRECTOR: HAL ASHBY
US, 1973

With an unconventional script by Robert Towne (CHINATOWN) and understated performances by Jack Nicholson and Randy Quaid, Ashby’s whimsical film is an exemplar of the freeform cinematic aesthetic of the 1970s. Billy “Bad Ass” Budduskey (Nicholson) and Mule Mulhall (Otis Young) are two sailors given a week to escort a young prisoner (Randy Quaid) from Virginia to a naval penitentiary in Maine. Intending to conclude their business quickly and spend the rest of their time partying, the two men instead become enamored of the young prisoner and decide to include him in their ribald revelry. (104 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 2, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE 400 BLOWS
DIRECTOR: FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT
FRANCE, 1959

Truffaut’s autobiographical first feature remains for many his best film. Drawing upon his early years as an orphan, Truffaut gives subtle and realistic meaning to the Chinese proverb about the 400 blows of childhood. Jean-Pierre Léaud plays Antoine Doinel, a neglected 12-year-old who rebels against school and escapes to freedom. The second of five films in his “Doinel” cycle, this early French New Wave milestone is one of the most poignant and moving studies of childhood ever put on film—honest, funny, unsentimental, and full of passion—in Truffaut’s words, “to show adolescence as the painful experience that it is.” (99 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 8, 2014
at 6:30 PM

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CANCELLED SHOW: VOYAGE TO THE EDGE OF THE WORLD
DIRECTOR: JACQUES-YVES COUSTEAU, PHILIPPE COUSTEAU, MARSHALL FLAUM
FRANCE, 1976

Jacques-Yves Cousteau became a household name throughout the world following such classic oceanographic portraits as THE SILENT WORLD (1956) and WORLD WITHOUT SUN (1964), as well as numerous popular books. The last of his feature films follows an expedition to Antarctica and presents the first footage shot underwater there, now a focal point for the world oceanographic community. During the production of the film, chief mate Michel Laval of Cousteau’s ship, the Calypso, died in a helicopter accident, casting a somber, haunting pallor over this magical film. (92 mins.)

This show has been canceled due to complications related to theatrical rights.


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Fri, Aug 8, 2014
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Aug 9, 2014
at 5 PM

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THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 2004

Inspired by the world of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Anderson’s comedy/drama stars Anderson regular Bill Murray as the eponymous Zissou, a famed but down-on-his-luck oceanographer and filmmaker working on a new project. When the mysterious “Jaguar Shark” devours his devoted friend (Seymour Cassel), Zissou sets out to make a documentary of the destruction of a terrifying creature that may or may not exist. Meanwhile, his wife Eleanor (Anjelica Huston) is carrying on with Zissou’s biggest rival, an inquisitive reporter (Cate Blanchett) is on his case, and an Air Kentucky pilot (Owen Wilson) turns up insisting that they are father and son. Part parody and part homage to Cousteau, THE LIFE AQUATIC rewards the viewer willing to venture into a zany, below-the-surface world. (119 mins.)

Marc Mohan, film critic at The Oregonian, will introduce the film on Friday evening.


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Sat, Aug 9, 2014
at 7:30 PM

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FITZCARRALDO
DIRECTOR: WERNER HERZOG
GERMANY, 1982

FITZCARRALDO remains one of the cinema’s most enduring tales of man versus nature, both onscreen and (famously) in production. Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, nicknamed “Fitzcarraldo” by the South American natives among whom he lives, is an eccentric visionary who dreams only on an epic scale. Already bankrupted by a Trans-Andean railroad scheme, he next decides to build a world-class opera house in the middle of the Peruvian jungle. To raise the funds, he plans to harvest a grove of rubber trees made inaccessible by nearby rapids. His solution: to introduce a modern steamship to the unruly waterway by dragging the entire vessel overland—a feat which Herzog himself, in true Fitzcarraldo fashion, obstinately accomplished without the aid of special effects or miniatures. (158 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 15, 2014
at 6:30 PM

Sat, Aug 16, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE RIVER
DIRECTOR: JEAN RENOIR
FRANCE/INDIA, 1951

Renoir’s film, late in his filmmaking career, sees the master working in color for the first time. The story follows a well-to-do British family living on the banks of the Ganges River. Teenager Harriet (Patricia Walters) and her sisters are brought up in an environment that melds the philosophies of East and West in equal measure. When a British military captain (Thomas Breen) moves in with his cousin next door, Harriet and her sisters are all smitten. As the captain’s attentions move elsewhere, Harriet is forced to take extreme measures. A beautifully photographed and deeply felt examination of coming of age in a colonial environment, THE RIVER portrays a world in which there is no perceptible way out of one’s immediate troubles. (99 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 15, 2014
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Aug 16, 2014
at 9 PM

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THE DARJEELING LIMITED
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 2007

Anderson continues his examination of modern family dynamics in this tale of three brothers, Francis, Jack, and Peter (Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, and Adrien Brody), on a rail-bound spiritual journey through the heart of India following the death of their father. Francis, the eldest and most alpha-type, plans the trip, telling Jack and Peter that they need to reconnect. However, the trip is really a pilgrimage to see their estranged mother (Anjelica Huston), who has been living in a remote monastery for several years. While at first it’s clear that the three fail to see eye-to-eye on almost every issue, the tumultuous voyage brings out their love for each other, despite their flaws, which not so coincidentally seem built from the detritus of their parents’ relationship. (91 mins.)

Jamie S. Rich, film critic at The Oregonian, will introduce the film on Friday evening, August 15.


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Sun, Aug 17, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS
DIRECTOR: BOB RAFELSON
US, 1972

“After the success of FIVE EASY PIECES, Rafelson and Nicholson reunited to make this underappreciated but key work of 1970s Hollywood cinema, a corrosive vision of the American Dream that is a ghostly anticipation of present times. The deserted boardwalks and seedy, decaying splendor of out-of-season Atlantic City form the wintry backdrop to this drama of two brothers, a late-night talk show host and a restless ex-con, who get mixed up with the mob while hatching a get-rich-quick scheme to open a South Seas gambling resort.”—The Museum of Modern Art. (103 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 22, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE TALE OF THE FOX
DIRECTOR: IRENE AND WLADYSLAW STAREWICZ
FRANCE, 1930/1937

An inspiration for Anderson’s FANTASTIC MR. FOX, this whimsical tale was one of the first animated features in cinema history and remains one of its most influential. Master Fox, the forest’s utmost trickster, harasses the king upon whose lands he lives with little recourse. Following a particularly wily hoax, however, the king orders Master Fox to be arrested and brought before the court. Featuring inventive stop-motion animation and beautiful black-and-white cinematography, THE TALE OF THE FOX is a masterpiece in economical storytelling. (65 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 22, 2014
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Aug 23, 2014
at 5 PM

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FANTASTIC MR. FOX
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 2009

Anderson’s first animated film, adapted from a story by legendary children’s author Roald Dahl, is a stop-motion thrill ride through the secret world of animals by way of the terror that is factory farming. Mr. Fox (voiced by George Clooney) and his wife (Meryl Streep), after being trapped following a disastrous farm raid, move to the base of a tree with their gloomy son Ash (Jason Schwartzman) in search of a more peaceful life. However, their tree lies next to a large farming facility run by three suspect farmers, who quickly initiate a scheme to flush the foxes out and hunt them. Naturally, Mr. Fox and crew are not so easily duped, teaming up with their fellow animal friends to launch a counterattack. (87 mins.)


Animation director Mark Gustafson will introduce the film at the August 22 screening.

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Sat, Aug 23, 2014
at 7 PM

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KING KONG
DIRECTOR: MERIAN C. COOPER, ERNEST B. SCHOEDSACK
US, 1933

At the time of its release, KING KONG was the greatest spectacle the filmgoing public had ever seen. A classic tale of adventure and reckless exploitation, the story follows ambitious filmmaker Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong) as he embarks on a dangerous project in an unknown land. Unable to find a suitable leading lady for his film, he resorts to casting Ann Darrow (Fay Wray), whom he finds on the streets of New York City. Together they embark on a journey to the South Pacific, where Denham plans to find a secret island on which lives a creature called “Kong.” The rest of the story is firmly entrenched in Hollywood lore: the great ape becomes smitten with Ann, and when Denham manages to bring Kong back to New York for his film’s big premiere, the beast breaks loose and terrorizes the city in one of the most lavish and exciting action sequences in cinema history. (100 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 30, 2014
at 6 PM

Sun, Aug 31, 2014
at 4:45 PM

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MOONRISE KINGDOM
DIRECTOR: WES ANDERSON
US, 2012

Anderson’s films are in some way about journeys—physical, spiritual, and sometimes both. Here his vision of childhood passages of discovery is rendered in the story of Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward), both introspective 12-year-olds living on the island of New Penzance—Suzy permanently, Sam temporarily for Khaki Scout summer camp. They fall in love and carry on an epistolary romance after meeting during the production of a play. The sweethearts run away together, much to the worry of their parents, counselors, and, eventually, social workers. New to both of them and carefully explored, sexual tension crops up almost immediately, while what seems to be the entire town bears down on them and a historically significant storm looms over the island. (94 mins.)

Erik Henriksen, film critic at the Portland Mercury, will introduce the film on Saturday evening.


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Sat, Aug 30, 2014
at 8:30 PM

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BLACK JACK
DIRECTOR: KEN LOACH
GREAT BRITAIN, 1979

Adapted from Leon Garfield’s novel of the same name, this whimsical yet terrifying children’s adventure strays from Loach’s usual realist subject matter while retaining the impactful spare visuals of his best-known films. Bartholomew (Stephen Hirst), a young haberdasher’s apprentice, is kidnapped by a thief known only as “Black Jack” (Jean Franval), who has managed to survive death by hanging. The two set off on a freewheeling journey through the countryside, only to meet a peculiar girl named Belle (Louise Cooper) with whom Bartholomew becomes infatuated. “That rare children’s film that cleaves not between old and young but between rich and poor.”—The Chicago Reader. (105 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 31, 2014
at 7 PM

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SMALL CHANGE
DIRECTOR: FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT
FRANCE, 1976

Following his critical successes with THE 400 BLOWS, JULES AND JIM, and other films, Truffaut achieved his greatest commercial success with SMALL CHANGE, a slice-of-life portrait of a school class that showcases the spectrum of personalities contained within. Shot using mostly non-professional actors, it is at once a snapshot of France in the mid-1970s and a near-universal look at childhood through the lens of those living it in the moment. “A comedy, a romance, a mystery—in a word: childhood—captured, distilled, and transformed effortlessly from sketchbook to symphony in the hands of a master named François Truffaut.”—Wes Anderson. (104 mins.)

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