Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2014
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Forever Burt

Burt Lancaster cut his teeth in the circus and vaudeville but achieved everlasting fame in the motion pictures. Iconic star of such classic films as THE KILLERS (1946), SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS (1957), and BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ (1962), he acted with charm and wit, starring alongside some of Hollywood’s most glamorous and respected stars. Lancaster daringly performed his own stunts throughout his career, often making public appearances recreating noteworthy stunts as proof. Finally, with partners Harold Hecht and James Hill, Lancaster cannily produced films under their HHL banner—including many of Lancaster’s films and critical and commercial successes like MARTY (winner of the 1955 Academy Award for Best Picture). Lancaster’s film career spanned countless genres over five decades, during which the popularization of color in film, the Hollywood blacklist, and the move to widescreen all transformed the industry. This 12-film retrospective (on 35mm prints!) features some of Lancaster’s most esteemed roles and reveals that while changes to the industry are visible in the films, one constant remains: Lancaster and his trademark grin.



Fri, Feb 28, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Mar 1, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS
DIRECTOR: ALEXANDER MACKENDRICK
US, 1957

The New York media ecosystem in the 1950s, seen here through famed cinematographer James Wong Howe’s expressive lens and left-wing screenwriter Clifford Odets’s cracked vision, was a cutthroat world in which men would do anything to succeed, freely tossing morals and ethics aside. In this context, Lancaster seethes as high-profile gossip columnist and blackmail artist extraordinaire J.J. Hunsecker. He enlists Sidney Falco (Tony Curtis), a down-on-his-luck press agent, to do his bidding when Hunsecker decides that the man dating his sister (Susan Harrison) is no good. Falco resists until Hunsecker makes him an offer he can’t pass up: to take over Hunsecker’s wildly popular gossip column. “The film stands as the record of one of the most convincing and closely observed symbiotic relationships in the movies. Hunsecker and Falco. You can’t have one without the other.”—Roger Ebert. (96 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 2, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Mar 30, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE CRIMSON PIRATE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT SIODMAK
US, 1952

The most successful of Lancaster’s many action-packed swashbucklers made for his Hecht-Hill-Lancaster production company, THE CRIMSON PIRATE features Lancaster as Captain Vallo, leader of a ship of pirates intent on disrupting the plans of the British navy, who are sailing through the Caribbean to quash a rebellion on the island of Cobra. Aided by his first mate Ojo (Lancaster’s boyhood friend and circus partner Nick Cravat), Vallo meets with the rebels and promises to help them, but the rebels, wary of outsiders, do not trust him. As Vallo, Ojo, and the rest of the pirates work to prove themselves trustworthy, Vallo’s lust for money threatens to undermine their efforts. “Any viewer with a drop of red blood in his veins and with fond memories of the Douglas Fairbanks Sr. school of derring-do should be happy to go on this last cruise of the crimson pirate.”—The New York Times. (105 mins.)

Burt Lancaster's youngest daughter, Joanna Lancaster, in attendance for a post-screening Q&A at the 3/30 screening.

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 2, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
CRISS CROSS
DIRECTOR: ROBERT SIODMAK
US, 1949

Arguably the prototypical Los Angeles noir and featuring extensive location photography in the Bunker Hill neighborhood shortly before it was razed to the ground, CRISS CROSS sees Lancaster donning the role of Steve Thompson, an armored truck driver who returns to Los Angeles in an attempt to rekindle a relationship with his estranged wife Anna (Yvonne De Carlo). However, Anna has fallen for mobster Slim Dundee (Dan Duryea). Despite Anna’s new marriage to Slim, she and Steve carry on an affair, but when Slim catches them, Steve is desperate for an explanation: a risky heist involving all of them, the target being Steve’s own armored truck. “An archly noir story replete with triple and quadruple crosses, leading up to one of the most shockingly cynical endings in the whole genre.”—Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader. (88 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sat, Mar 8, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
TRAPEZE
DIRECTOR: CAROL REED
US, 1956

In TRAPEZE, a “picture that soars high, high, high above them all,” Lancaster returns to his first love, the circus, as Mike Ribble, a legendary high-wire trapeze artist who was injured during a show. Ribble still performs, but in a supporting role; Tino Orsini (Tony Curtis), an up-and-coming young American, now handles the big stunts in the company under Ribble’s tutelage. Lola (Gina Lollobrigida), a newcomer to the troupe, has big dreams like Orsini, but as a love triangle forms between the three and Orsini’s aspirations grow, Ribble’s support of his protégés begins to wane and the troupe’s future is left in serious doubt. Shot in both CinemaScope and color and featuring several thrilling action scenes, TRAPEZE is a film bristling with tension from an unexpected source. (105 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sat, Mar 8, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 9, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE KILLERS
DIRECTOR: ROBERT SIODMAK
US, 1946

A critical and commercial smash featuring Lancaster’s screen debut as Swede, a man running from his past who’s too tired to run anymore, THE KILLERS is one of the key film noirs of the 1940s and one of the most atmospheric and tense films of the classical Hollywood period. In an unnamed rural town, Swede lives an unassuming life working at a service station and keeping to himself. Through a series of flashbacks, however, we get extended glimpses into his prior life as a professional boxer mixed up with several shady characters, including crime boss “Big Jim” Colfax (Albert Dekker) and enchanting vixen Kitty Collins (Ava Gardner). Swede and Big Jim go in on a robbery, but in a world where double-crossing is expected at every juncture, plans go awry, and Swede, Kitty, and Big Jim are all forced to reconcile their desires with their immediate reality. Based on the short story by Ernest Hemingway. (103 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Fri, Mar 14, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Mar 15, 2014
at 7:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
BRUTE FORCE
DIRECTOR: JULES DASSIN
US, 1947

“Soon-to-be-blacklisted director Jules Dassin’s excoriating and angry prison drama uses the ‘big cage’ as a metaphor for the lost innocence and spiritual malignancy of post-WWII America. One in a series of ’40s films haunted by talismanic portraits of women, BRUTE FORCE uses a dreamy calendar model as the inspiration for a series of flashbacks that reveal Lancaster and his fellow cellmates to be united by bad luck, bad timing, and impossible love. Lancaster’s mournful yearning turns to embittered rage when a carefully planned breakout pits him against the messianic and warped ego of the Napoleonic prison warden, made viciously real by the brilliant Hume Cronyn. During the film’s furious, fiery climax of man against machine, Lancaster’s expressive use of his body is harrowing and perhaps unsurpassed in his entire career.”—Harvard Film Archive. (98 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 16, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL
DIRECTOR: JOHN STURGES
US, 1957

Lancaster takes on a legend of the West in his role as lawman Wyatt Earp opposite Kirk Douglas’s gunslinger Doc Holliday. The story is familiar: Holliday is in Dodge City, having murdered the brother of Texas Ed Bailey (Lee Van Cleef), who seeks revenge; Earp, just arriving in Dodge, seeks to apprehend a group of outlaws led by Ike Clanton (Lyle Bettger). Despite Holliday’s shady past and their troubled relationship, Earp needs the gunslinger’s help to bring down the Clantons—but can they trust each other? In one of the great pairings in screen history, GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL sees Lancaster radiating a quiet, refined power while Douglas simmers with raw energy. (122 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 16, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
VERA CRUZ
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALDRICH
US, 1954

A detailed study in contrasts, VERA CRUZ pairs Lancaster’s smarmy, conniving rancher with Gary Cooper’s upstanding, old-guard Southern gentleman in the 19th-century Mexican desert as guns-for-hire. The two meet by chance as Joe Erin (Lancaster) attempts to steal Benjamin Trane’s (Cooper) horse. They both have bigger problems, however, as they are quickly caught up in the Mexican Revolution of 1866. Hired by the reigning French royalty to escort a beautiful countess (Denise Darcel) across Mexico to Vera Cruz, the two men and their reluctantly assembled gang must choose between following through with the mission honestly or following their intuition when they discover that several million dollars in gold is hiding somewhere in the convoy. (94 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Mon, Mar 17, 2014
at 6:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ
DIRECTOR: JOHN FRANKENHEIMER, CHARLES CRICHTON
US, 1962

“In this film based on a true story, Lancaster stars as convicted murderer and lifelong prisoner Robert Stroud. Forever isolated in solitary confinement, Stroud begins to develop an interest in injured birds, then how birds—and men—react to being caged. As much a chamber drama as a prison film, BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ shows Lancaster at his best, never letting us forget the violence in Stroud’s past but eliciting empathy for his situation and admiration for his insightful attempts to understand its impact on him and his fellow prisoners.”—George Eastman House. (147 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 23, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
ELMER GANTRY
DIRECTOR: RICHARD BROOKS
US, 1960

“Burt Lancaster won his only Academy Award (out of four nominations) for his devilishly seductive performance as a down-and-out scoundrel turned fiery preacher in Richard Brooks’s adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s novel. Jean Simmons plays the revival leader who falls for his line and Shirley Jones as the prostitute who undoes him. Lancaster’s spellbinding energy extends Brooks’s assault on religious hypocrisy to critique the very charisma that made him a star.”—UCLA Film & Television Archive. (146 mins.)

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Fri, Mar 28, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Mar 29, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE SWIMMER
DIRECTOR: FRANK PERRY, SYDNEY POLLACK
US, 1968

Based on the famous John Cheever story of the same name, THE SWIMMER interrogates the American Dream, illuminating the ways that an upper-middle-class lifestyle can look wonderful on the surface but is occasionally built on a very unstable foundation. Lancaster here plays Ned Merrill, a seemingly successful businessman living in suburban Connecticut. He appears one day wandering through the woods in a swimsuit and finds himself in the backyard of some friends. After someone notes that there are swimming pools lining the periphery of the neighborhood, Ned decides to swim through them, traveling through past transgressions along the way, as each pool becomes a symbol for a specific time in his life. (95 mins.)


Burt Lancaster's youngest daughter, Joanna Lancaster, in attendance for a post-screening Q&A at the 3/29 screening.

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top

Sun, Mar 30, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
ATLANTIC CITY
DIRECTOR: LOUIS MALLE
US, 1980

“As if his 1940s noir hoodlum had lived to see the 1980s, Lancaster’s Lou Pasco catches only faint echoes of those glory days between his small numbers-running and petty errand-running for an aging widow of a notorious gangster. As Atlantic City disintegrates before him, Lou maintains his dignity and a tender awareness of the station to which age and cultural change have taken him. When a drug deal brings the crime underworld on his heels, money in his pocket, and a charming young woman at his side, he accepts this second youth with a giddy astonishment and chivalrous self-possession tempered by the wisdom of age. Rather than fall into tried-and-true mannerisms, Lancaster embraces Louis Malle’s sweet rendering with the restraint of an actor humbly consenting to yet another reincarnation.”—Harvard Film Archive. (104 mins.)

Burt Lancaster's youngest daughter, Joanna Lancaster, in attendance for a post-screening Q&A.

Download program notes (PDF).


^ Top


   
© 2009-2014 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development