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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2014
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Fri, Sep 6, 2013
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 7, 2013
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 8, 2013
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE MACHINE WHICH MAKES EVERYTHING DISAPPEAR
DIRECTOR: TINATIN GURCHIANI
GEORGIA, 2012

Winner of the Documentary Directing Prize at this year's Sundance Film Festival, "The story begins with an experiment. A filmmaker in the country of Georgia posts an ad inviting youth to audition for her film. Facing the camera, the hopefuls confess their struggles and dreams. These raw interviews unfold seamlessly into cinematic slivers of Georgian life. A teenager awaits news of his father's surgery. A girl anticipates her wedding. The governor of a tiny village faces a monumental decision. A soldier attempts to link his imprisoned brother to the world outside, and a young woman confronts the mother who abandoned her. These threads form a fluid Altman-esque collage of characters—and a nation—teetering on the brink of change. It's a world where tradition and modernity subtly intermingle: singing traditional ballads is as common a self-expression as listening to hip-hop or playing online poker. Mixing metanarrative with heightened visual aesthetics, the film intuitively penetrates individual lives to conjure a richly layered, indelible portrait of a society, brilliantly becoming more than the sum of its parts."—Sundance Film Festival. (97 mins.)

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Sat, Sep 7, 2013
at 4 PM

Watch Trailer
VALOR WITH HONOR
DIRECTOR: BURT TAKEUCHI
2010

VALOR WITH HONOR is an independent documentary film based on over 35 interviews of Japanese American veterans who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during WW2. This small segregated unit of 3500 men is the most decorated American unit for its size and length of service (3 years). By the end of WW2, the 442nd would be awarded with 7 Presidential Unit Citations, 21 Medals of Honor (upgraded from DSC), over 500 Silver Stars, and over 9000 Purple Hearts. In 2012, the 100th Battalion, 442nd, and MIS were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for outstanding service in WW2. The 85 minute feature film describes the harrowing stories of 442nd's battles in Italy, the Lost Battalion Rescue in France, the assault up Mount Folgorito, and witness to the holocaust at Dachau, Germany. The film concludes with the vets bittersweet return home to America. The entire film is woven through stories told by the veterans themselves.

Co-presented with the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and the Oregon Historical Society

( 85 min )
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Fri, Sep 13, 2013
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 14, 2013
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 15, 2013
at 7 PM

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Read Review
L'AVVENTURA
DIRECTOR: MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
ITALY/FRANCE, 1960

Antonioni's meditation on meaning in modern existence remains an obligatory experience in existential cinema-going. On a yachting trip off Sicily, a woman (Lea Massari) mysteriously disappears during an excursion on a desolate island. Her lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and her friend (Monica Vitti) begin a search, but during the fruitless quest, each slowly becomes enamored of the other and their guilt is soon replaced by passion. L'AVVENTURA is at once a mesmerizing mystery, a thought-provoking study of human behavior—the impermanence of romance, bourgeois boredom, and the ease with which we betray one another—an experiment in the expressive use of landscape and architecture, and an allegory on the troubled state of postwar Italy. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes. (143 mins.)

New 35mm print.


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Sat, Sep 14, 2013
at 5 PM

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Read Review
TBA FEST, QDOC, AND NWFC PRESENT: PARIS IS BURNING
DIRECTOR: JENNIE LIVINGSTON
US, 1990

"Having a ball... Wish you were here..." is the catch phrase of Livingston's iconic film, a lively exploration of the "golden age" of voguing and drag ball culture in New York City in the 1980s and the African-American and Latino gay and transgender communities that fueled the creative explosion. First operating below the radar of popular culture, the raucous celebrations became the opportunity for powerful expressions of fierce personal pride and social commentary, revealing the ambitions, desires, and yearnings of a uniquely American community in search of affirmation, acceptance, joy, and love. Winner of the Grand Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. (75 mins.)

Presented as part of Portland Institute for Contemporary Arts' Time-Based Art (TBA) Festival. Special admission: $7 general, $5 Silver Screen Club Friends.


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Fri, Sep 20, 2013
at 6:30 PM

Sat, Sep 21, 2013
at 8:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
TBA FEST AND NWFC PRESENT: DANIEL BARROW: THE THIEF OF MIRRORS/LOOKING FOR LOVE IN THE HALL OF MIRRORS
DIRECTOR: DANIEL BARROW
US, 2012

Since the early '90s, Daniel Barrow has developed a unique style of "manual" animation, layering and manipulating his intricate drawings on overhead projectors. In THE THIEF OF MIRRORS, Barrow tells the story of a jewel thief who wears the mask of a sad clown. His deep, emotive eyes charge the mask with supernatural powers. So captivating is his expression that his gaze can permanently inscribe his visage in the glass. The work pays homage to the classic archetype of the "kissing bandit"—the cat burglar who creeps into women's homes, collects their jewelry, and kisses them in their sleep, leaving them both violated and charmed. Exploring forgotten sexual mores and kitschy characters, Barrow walks the razor edge of irony, challenging systems of class and control in our culture. (75 mins.)

BUY TICKETS

Funded in part by the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. Presented as part of Portland Institute for Contemporary Arts' Time-Based Art (TBA) Festival. Special admission: $20 general, $15 Silver Screen Club members.


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Fri, Sep 20, 2013
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Sep 21, 2013
at 4 PM

Sun, Sep 22, 2013
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Sep 22, 2013
at 7 PM

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Read Review
HERB & DOROTHY 50X50
DIRECTOR: MEGUMI SASAKI
US, 2012

A follow-up to Sasaki's HERB & DOROTHY, 50X50 revisits the remarkable art-collecting couple Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, who, with very modest means, accumulated one of the world's most important contemporary art collections. This new chapter tells the remarkable story of "The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: 50 Works for 50 States." The gift project was initiated after the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC—where the Vogels' over 4,000 works were to find their permanent home—deemed their collection to be more than they could manage. So, as the name suggests, the project distributed the collection in groups of 50 works to an institution in each of the 50 states (Portland Art Museum included), making it one of the largest philanthropic arts patronage initiatives in our country's history. (87 mins.)

See the Portland Art Museum's Vogel Collection


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Fri, Sep 27, 2013
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 29, 2013
at 4:30 PM

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Read Review
WHITE NIGHTS
DIRECTOR: LUCHINO VISCONTI
ITALY, 1957

Adapting a Dostoyevsky short story set in 19th-century St. Petersburg to 1950s Liverno, Italy, Visconti's theatrical film tale is of two drifting souls whose chance meeting leads to flirting romance and then reality. Marcello Mastroianni (in his first starring role), new to the city and lonely, and Maria Schell, haunted by an absent boyfriend's (Jean Marais) promise, begin a tentative affair that soon entangles them in a web of longing and self-delusion. "Today the film's dreamlike quality gives it a hypnotic force, echoed in the choice that a guileless Maria Schell must make between the sinister magnetism of her lover or the safer affections of the petit-bourgeois Mario, a character whose utter ordinariness Mastroianni endows with a nuanced comic power."—UCLA Film Archive. (97 mins.)

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Sat, Sep 28, 2013
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 29, 2013
at 7 PM

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Read Review
THE GOLDEN COACH
DIRECTOR: JEAN RENOIR
FRANCE/ITALY, 1952

Renoir's 18th-century comic fantasy is a valentine to the theater and the music of Vivaldi, starring the larger-than-life Anna Magnani. A commedia dell'arte troupe from Italy arrives in an 18th-century Peruvian town where the viceroy, infatuated by the leading actress Camilla, presents her with the fabulous golden coach, a symbol of power that he intended for his mistress. "Light and serious, cynical and exquisite, a blend of color, wit, and Vivaldi.... Anna Magnani tries out a series of love roles in a play within a play within a movie. Magnani with her deep sense of the ridiculous in herself and others, Magnani with her roots in the earth, is the miraculous choice that gives this film its gusto and its piercing beauty."—Pauline Kael. (103 mins.)

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Fri, Oct 4, 2013
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 5, 2013
at 7 PM

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Read Review
PORT OF SHADOWS
DIRECTOR: MARCEL CARNÉ
FRANCE, 1938

The first of the collaborations between director Marcel Carné and writer Jacques Prévert, who would go on to make LE JOUR SE LÈVE (1939) and CHILDREN OF PARADISE (1945), PORT OF SHADOWS is a melancholy poem of life and death in the lower depths of Le Havre. Jean Gabin projects stubborn dignity and deep weariness as Jean, a deserter from the French colonial army who arrives one foggy night at an otherworldly waterfront dive. There he encounters a variety of underworld characters including a beautiful, troubled young woman (Michèle Morgan), who, like Jean, dreams of some kind of escape—from the past, from the shadowy streets, and from her sinister guardian, unsettlingly played by Michel Simon. Eugen Shufftan's atmospheric cinematography matches the lyrical pessimism of Prévert's dialogue; figures come and go in the nocturnal mist, moments of violence or unexpected generosity interrupting their fundamental solitude. "A marvelously moody thriller.... Seldom has the seedy side of life seemed so utterly seductive."—BFI. (91 mins.)

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Sat, Nov 2, 2013
at 4:30 PM

Sat, Nov 2, 2013
at 7 PM

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Read Review
M
DIRECTOR: FRITZ LANG
GERMANY, 1931

Featuring a new digital restoration by the Munich Film Archive, M is one of the most influential films in the thriller genre. Fritz Lang's first sound film is a haunting, terrifying dive into an urban underworld where the lines between good and evil are disturbingly murky. Hans Beckert—Peter Lorre in an indelible performance—is a child murderer tracked by both the police and his criminal colleagues. "In the rigor of its construction where theme, style, and mood all express a kind of entrapment that is at once psychological and based in reality, M is a precursor not only to Lang's American films but to American film noir in general. Sound is used ingeniously, with music limited to the Peer Gynt theme which both torments the murderer and hauntingly announces his presence in place of the image. Few films have so successfully fused atmosphere with plot, image with sound, and expressed gestures with those unexpressed but felt."—British Film Institute. (111 mins.)

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Sun, Nov 3, 2013
at 7:30 PM

CERTIFIABLY YOURS: NEW FILMS FROM THE SCHOOL OF FILM

Join us as we screen and celebrate the achievements of this year's matriculating School of Film Certificate Program students. Each filmmaker will present the short narrative film that they have created as the culminating effort of their studies. Lev Yarborough's PERFORMING LIVES reveals the lives and talents of gifted young performance artists; Geoff Peterson's MANGO follows a confident psychic who challenges a skeptical non-believer; Josh Westra's INBOUND follows a call center employee who is stalked by incoming calls; and Alex Maroney's THEY HAVE ARRIVED shows a man who loses his best friend to powers from the beyond. These final projects showcase the skill and voice that each individual has developed through class exercises, visiting artist sessions, group projects, faculty advising, and extracurricular pursuits. (90 mins.)

A reception honoring the filmmakers begins at 6:30 PM in the Andrée Stevens Room. Free admission.


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