Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2014
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Fri, Nov 23, 2012
at 7 PM

Fri, Nov 23, 2012
at 8:45 PM

Sat, Nov 24, 2012
at 4:30 PM

Sat, Nov 24, 2012
at 6:30 PM

Sat, Nov 24, 2012
at 8:30 PM

Sun, Nov 25, 2012
at 2 PM

Sun, Nov 25, 2012
at 4 PM

Sun, Nov 25, 2012
at 7 PM

Mon, Nov 26, 2012
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
TALES OF THE NIGHT
DIRECTOR: MICHEL OCELOT
FRANCE, 2011

Renowned animation auteur Michel Ocelot’s new film extends the distinguished shadow puppet style of his PRINCES AND PRINCESSES and AZUR AND ASMAR with black-silhouetted characters set off against exquisitely detailed Day-Glo backgrounds bursting with color and kaleidoscopic patterns. A girl, a boy, and an old man get together in a small movie theater full of wonders where they invent, draw, dress up, and become characters in magical stories. The film weaves together six of their exotic fables, each unfolding in a unique locale—Tibet, medieval Europe, an Aztec kingdom, the African plains, and even the Land of the Dead. In Ocelot’s storytelling, history blends with fairytale as he whisks us away to enchanted lands full of dragons, werewolves, captive princesses, sorcerers, and enormous talking bees. (84 mins.)

In French with English subtitles; afternoon screenings (before 5 p.m.) are dubbed in English for younger audiences.


^ Top

Thu, Nov 29, 2012
at 6:30 PM

Sun, Dec 2, 2012
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
THE TIN DRUM
DIRECTOR’S CUT
DIRECTOR: VOLKER SCHLÖNDORFF
GERMANY, 1979

Based on Gunter Grass’ acclaimed novel, this allegorical story traces the life of a troubled boy, Oskar, who refuses to grow up as the rise and fall of the Third Reich takes place around him. Precocious Oskar has two skills which keep the hypocritical behavior of adults at bay: he can pound his drum mercilessly, and he can scream at such a pitch that glass shatters. Exploring the links between political and sexual politics—as seen through the eyes of a child—the story takes on its own reality to convey the dark and troubled times of Germany in the 20th century and remains an eloquent and disturbing look at a country dangerously caught up in its own complacency. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, THE TIN DRUM is an unforgettable fantasia of surreal imagery, striking eroticism, and unflinching satire. This newly restored version includes 25 minutes Schlöndorff was obliged to cut from his 1979 original. (167 mins.)

Mature audiences.


^ Top

Fri, Nov 30, 2012
at 7 PM

Sat, Dec 1, 2012
at 4:30 PM

Sat, Dec 1, 2012
at 7 PM

FRESH FRENCH SHORTS
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
FRANCE, 2011-2012

Our annual compilation of recent shorts by emerging French directors offers an eclectic selection of narrative, documentary, and animated international prizewinners that give voice to the diversity of French culture and fresh new talents. The program includes: THE GREAT RABBIT by Atsushi Wada (7 mins.); EVERYONE SAYS I LOVE YOU by Cécile Ducrocq (6 mins.); KALI THE LITTLE VAMPIRE by Regina Pessoa (10 mins.); CATHARSIS by Cédric Prévost (18 mins.); EDMOND WAS A DONKEY by Franck Dion (15 mins.); A SHADOW OF BLUE by Carlos Lascano (13 mins.); and GOD’S THE ONE TO TELL by Elsa Diringer (13 mins.). Complete program notes available at the screenings. (90 mins.)

Co-presented with the Alliance Française de Portland, with support from Le Happy.


^ Top

Thu, Dec 6, 2012
at 7 PM

Fri, Dec 7, 2012
at 7 PM

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP
DIRECTOR: MICHAEL POWELL
GREAT BRITAIN, 1943

Newly restored to pristine 35mm Technicolor glory by the Academy Film Archive in association with the British Film Institute National Archive and the Film Foundation, legendary producers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s (THIEF OF BAGDAD, THE RED SHOES) COLONEL BLIMP remains one of the classics of British cinema. Based on a famous newspaper cartoon series, the film stars Roger Livesay as Clive Candy, who describes in flashback his “illustrious” 40-year military career from the Boer War up until World War II. Deborah Kerr plays Candy’s love interests over the years in three leading roles. Made in 1942 when Britain was under perilous German siege, this sublime romantic comedy was an outrageously original and passionate rejection of the wartime stress on realism and obedience. “Like much of Powell and Pressburger’s work, it is a salute to all that is paradoxical about the English; no one else has so well captured their romanticism banked down beneath emotional reticence and honor. And it is marked by an enormous generosity of spirit: in the history of the British cinema, there is nothing to touch it.”—Time Out London (163 mins.)

^ Top

Sun, Dec 16, 2012
at 7 PM

Mon, Dec 17, 2012
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
CHARLES DICKENS: A CHRISTMAS CAROL
DIRECTOR: BRIAN DESMOND HURST
GREAT BRITAIN/US, 1951

2012 marks the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens, whose great novels have held readers—and filmgoers—in sway for generations. Tonight, we offer the first of three of his classics on page and screen. Dickens’ tale of the miserly Scrooge, whose life passes before him when spirits visit him on Christmas Eve, finds definitive cinematic telling in Hurst’s luminous black-and-white classic. An incomparable roster of British actors—Michael Holden, Hattie Jacques, George Cole, and Alastair Sim as the comically miserly Ebenezer Scrooge—brings to life this inspiring story of hope coming only after gloom. (86 mins.)

35mm print from the British Film Institute.


^ Top

Thu, Dec 20, 2012
at 7 PM

Sat, Dec 22, 2012
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
CHARLES DICKENS: GREAT EXPECTATIONS
DIRECTOR: DAVID LEAN
GREAT BRITAIN, 1946

David Lean delivered arguably the finest of all Dickens screen adaptations. Orphan lad Pip (Anthony Wager) struggles to get by until an unknown benefactor provides him a generous allowance. Along the way, there’s an encounter with escaped convict Magwitch (Finlay Currie) on the foggy moors; etiquette lessons in the crumbling mansion of mad Miss Havisham (Martita Hunt), where he meets the lovely but cruel Estella (Jean Simmons) and best pal Herbert Pocket (Alec Guinness); and finally adventures in London as a young man on the move (now played by John Mills). (118 mins.)

Nominated for five Oscars with wins for Best Cinematography and Art Direction.


^ Top

Fri, Dec 21, 2012
at 7 PM

Sun, Dec 23, 2012
at 7 PM

Read Review
CHARLES DICKENS: THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY
DIRECTOR: ALBERT0 CAVALCANTI
GREAT BRITAIN, 1947

Cavalcanti’s Ealing Studios adaption of Dickens’ third novel is notable for its gritty visuals, depicting Victorian life with the contemporary cinematic styles of neorealism and film noir. His father dead and prospects dim, young Nicholas Nickleby (Derek Bond) must rely on his wealthy but wicked Uncle Ralph (Sir Cedric Hardwicke). A teaching post at the prison-like Dotheboys Hall in Yorkshire, run by vicious Wackford Squeers (Alfred Drayton), ends in violent confrontation, Nicholas fleeing with his friend Smike (Aubrey Woods) and returning to London just in time to defend his sister Kate (Sally Ann Howes) from Uncle Ralph’s predations. (108 mins.)

35mm print from the British Film Institute.


^ Top


   
© 2009-2014 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development